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Profession Lore

By any chance do anybody knew about the lore of each professions? I'll be glad to read and learn from it thanks :)

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  • The wiki has some lore for the Guardian, Engineer, and maybe Thief and Revenant.

    The Charr shall rule!

  • Above all note that the lore for Revenant makes player-character level 1 Revenants contradictory - the in-lore first Revenant is ((Someone)) who leaves ((Somewhere)) at the beginning of the HoT expansion, having become a Revenant while ((pronoun)) was there, and a player-character level 1 Revenant is one before that happens.

    @Biff.5312 said:
    Exercise your whimsy.

  • Fueki.4753Fueki.4753 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 31, 2020

    @Steve The Cynic.3217 said:
    Above all note that the lore for Revenant makes player-character level 1 Revenants contradictory - the in-lore first Revenant is ((Someone)) who leaves ((Somewhere)) at the beginning of the HoT expansion, having become a Revenant while ((pronoun)) was there, and a player-character level 1 Revenant is one before that happens.

    Player professions are just for play style.
    As far as lore goes, the commander (or hero of Shaemoor, Savant or whatever Norn, Charr and Sylvari were called in the beginning) does not have a set profession. Thus, it doesn't contradict the first Revenant thing.

  • Svennis.3852Svennis.3852 Member ✭✭✭
    edited October 31, 2020

    I want to say there was some kind of dev statement about this. Rytlock was the first Revenant, yes, but the workings of the mists are strange and unknowable. I think Rytlock's "awakening" rippled back in time, creating more Revenants. I might be making this up entirely though, so read with a grain of salt.

    In the end, I choose not to think too hard about it. x)

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    One thing which applies to all of them: they're called professions (instead of classes or whatever) because Anet wanted to make it clear this is a set of skills your character learns rather than something instictive or a power they're given. Everyone in Tyria can use magic and with the right training anyone can learn the skills necessary for any profession. Although I think just like in real life some people will be better at, or more interested in, certain skills so they'll be better suited to professions which use those.

    I think originally that was done to justify GW1 characters being able to change their secondary profession but it carries over to GW2 as well. There's a sylvari just outside the Grove who is crying because her trainer told her to give up on being an elementalist and learn to be a thief instead, but she wants to use magic. I'm sure there's other examples too but I can't remember them now.

    Danielle Aurorel, Desolation EU. Mini Collector

    "You can run like a river, Till you end up in the sea
    And you run till night is black, And keep on going in your dreams
    And you know all the long while, It's the journey that you seek
    It's the miles of moving forward, With the wind beneath your wings"

  • @Svennis.3852 said:
    In the end, I choose not to think too hard about it. x)

    That's probably the best thing to do.> @Fueki.4753 said:

    @Steve The Cynic.3217 said:
    Above all note that the lore for Revenant makes player-character level 1 Revenants contradictory - the in-lore first Revenant is ((Someone)) who leaves ((Somewhere)) at the beginning of the HoT expansion, having become a Revenant while ((pronoun)) was there, and a player-character level 1 Revenant is one before that happens.

    Player professions are just for play style.

    Indeed.

    As far as lore goes, the commander (or hero of Shaemoor, Savant or whatever Norn, Charr and Sylvari were called in the beginning) does not have a set profession. Thus, it doesn't contradict the first Revenant thing.

    Norn ==> Slayer
    Sylvari ==> Valiant (of the Wild Hunt)

    What I meant about the "first Revenant" thing was that ((Someone)) describes Revenant magic as new, as if nobody has used it before. (No, I'm not going to get into a debate about Ritualist vs Revenant, thanks, or at least not yet.) OK, yes, maybe he meant "new for a Charr" rather than "just plain new", but that just restricts the contradiction to level 1 Charr Revs. And he woiuld have described it differently, as if now Charr could do this Human (or Sylvari / Asura / Norn) thing. If he's not the first, and above all if the Commander is already a Revenant, he would have said something different.

    Maybe. Or maybe I'm overthinking it. It happens.

    @Biff.5312 said:
    Exercise your whimsy.

  • I mean are there any notable history for the professions like are necromancers feared or discriminated because who wouldn't be scared when they saw someone controlling the dead. or mesmer magic cause it's OP controlling reality and time.

  • @ralphches.1746 said:
    I mean are there any notable history for the professions like are necromancers feared or discriminated because who wouldn't be scared when they saw someone controlling the dead. or mesmer magic cause it's OP controlling reality and time.

    Have you read the books? Ghosts of Ascalon in particular talks about how some people view Necromancers (and other types of magic to a lesser extent), Sea of Sorrows shows a hand full of just about every profession in action and shows that some, if not all, Asura don't believe in fighting fair, and Edge of Destiny showcases Destiny's Edges' professions. More so Logan's than the others except for maybe Zoja, but it's still a good read.

    The Charr shall rule!

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @ralphches.1746 said:
    I mean are there any notable history for the professions like are necromancers feared or discriminated because who wouldn't be scared when they saw someone controlling the dead. or mesmer magic cause it's OP controlling reality and time.

    It varies by race, but in general Tyria seems somewhat unusual in fantasy worlds in that necromancy is largely accepted as just another form of magic. In GW1 at least some human necromancers are part of an order (just refered to as the Order, unknown if there's an actual name) which sets rules on what is and is not acceptable forms of necromancy and breaking those rules can lead to someone becoming an outcast among other necromancers. But even then it's largely about the end result rather than the type of magic used - for example the one outcast necromancer you deal with in a quest was kicked out and had a bounty placed on her head for creating her own corpses in order to speed up her research. No one minds necromancers experimenting with those who are already dead, but they draw the line at killing people to do it.

    Similarly there's asuran necromancers in both GW1 and 2 who experiment with ways to combine necromancy and golemancy and that's considered perfectly acceptable, but the Inquest caused a lot of controversy by inventing ways to absorb a subject's life force and put it into a golem or other machinery. It's virtually the same principal, but they did it to living people without their consent and that's where most asura draw the line.

    The tricky part is that while all this information is in the games there's not really a single place you can read it all, it's more a matter of finding mentions of a subject and remembering them to put together with other stuff from elsewhere later on. I'm not sure why the Wiki doesn't have much lore information relatively speaking, I suppose there's not a lot of cross-over between people who are interested in the lore and people who spend a lot of time editing the Wiki, and I'm not sure where else it would go. So mostly it's a matter of going through the game making sure you talk to everyone and listen to NPC dialogue whenever you can to find out how things work.

    Danielle Aurorel, Desolation EU. Mini Collector

    "You can run like a river, Till you end up in the sea
    And you run till night is black, And keep on going in your dreams
    And you know all the long while, It's the journey that you seek
    It's the miles of moving forward, With the wind beneath your wings"

  • @Danikat.8537 said:

    @ralphches.1746 said:
    I mean are there any notable history for the professions like are necromancers feared or discriminated because who wouldn't be scared when they saw someone controlling the dead. or mesmer magic cause it's OP controlling reality and time.

    It varies by race, but in general Tyria seems somewhat unusual in fantasy worlds in that necromancy is largely accepted as just another form of magic.

    Example: ESO, where necromancers are generally regarded with some ... negativity. Indeed, certain Necromancer skills/abilities are classed as criminal acts if you cast them in town, and can cause you to acquire a criminal record. This extends to the point that your Necro player character can ask questions / make comments of the "I"m a necromancer. Will that be a problem?" or "That thing you're doing kitten well is necromancy. I should know because I am a necromancer." types.

    @Biff.5312 said:
    Exercise your whimsy.

  • a general rule is that there are dedicated schools of magics across the world where you go and learn magic and your profession.

    Warriors are just warriors.

    Guardians rely on their virtues and magic to protect something or someone. Doesnt matter if the caster is "evil", if he has a strong belief to protect something they will

    Elementalists and mesmers are just wizards that use elemental and illusion magic

    Necromancer do use dark arts and can raise undead minions. But the lore about it is different from race to race. Generally speaking its not "evil" magic, and humans for example tied necromancy with their god of death Grenth. Their priests can be necromancers and brings comfort to those in grief of their dead.

    Engineers are also self explanatory, they learned how to tinker with gadgets, guns and rifles as well as alchemy to brew potions and poisons

    Thieves ..well.. not sure if there are dedicated public schools for that profession but you can imagine where its coming from.

    Rangers are nature loving people, their core principle tho is to rely on nature rather than technology. Unless anet retcons this you will never see a Ranger using pistols or rifles.

    Revenants are a bit weird. Basically anyone can become a revenant if they focus their will and establish a connection with the mist...somehow...
    The problem with Revenants is that they were not always there and nobody knew how to become one... Until rytlock came back from the mist during the start of HoT and started teaching others how to harness the power.
    This means that there were 0 revenants before that point, meaning during zhaitan story, season 2 story and a small part of HoT story, cannonically you cant play a revenant.

    The HoT elite specializations are just something core professions learned to adapt and do in the heart of maguuma, its just a specialization, an extension of their profession.
    A engineer became a scrapper and formed new flying gyros out of scraps form the wreckage of the Pact for example.

    The PoF elite specs went a little deeper in lore, where YOU (someone coming from core tyria) learned how the elonian natives managed to adapt their profession in their environment.
    You can also find some npcs that are using pof elite specs and you can ask them questions learning more about the lore

  • Dawdler.8521Dawdler.8521 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited November 8, 2020

    @Wolftail.3820 said:
    Necromancer do use dark arts and can raise undead minions. But the lore about it is different from race to race. Generally speaking its not "evil" magic, and humans for example tied necromancy with their god of death Grenth. Their priests can be necromancers and brings comfort to those in grief of their dead.

    Technically they summon minions. None of the minions are "raised" and none of them are "undead" since they where never alive. They are golems all of them.

    There's only one act of true "raising the dead" necromancy in the game and if you think about it, it explains the behaviour of many zombie players. It has nothing to do with the necromancer though.

    gaggle - /ˈɡaɡ(ə)l/ - noun
    A disorderly group of Asura.
    "The gaggle of Asura tried to agree on whether a phase-shifted thermonuclear energy matrix was sufficiently powerful for a device capable of heating bread"

  • Lore of the Warrior (written by big norn the warrior)

    Long ago, big norn the warrior learned. Stick 'em with the pointy end. Slice 'em with the sharp side. Smash 'em with the heavy end. Win.

    This is the secret of the warrior that has been passed down through the generations.

  • If we want to be fussy about what exactly necromancers do, I'd like to point out that the clue to what necromancers do is in the name. Necromancy is the art of divination (like all somethingmancy arts) by calling the spirits of the dead (the "necro" part).

    The thing that MMORPGs (and fantasy RPGs in general) call "necromancy" is more properly the domain of sorcerers.

    @Biff.5312 said:
    Exercise your whimsy.

  • @Wolftail.3820 said:

    Revenants are a bit weird. Basically anyone can become a revenant if they focus their will and establish a connection with the mist...somehow...
    The problem with Revenants is that they were not always there and nobody knew how to become one... Until rytlock came back from the mist during the start of HoT and started teaching others how to harness the power.
    This means that there were 0 revenants before that point, meaning during zhaitan story, season 2 story and a small part of HoT story, cannonically you cant play a revenant.

    I would say Rytlock was the first rev society knew about and who (might) talk about it. There is nothing stopping you creating a head cannon where your rev was an ordinary warrior who had a near death experience - and then was silent about it, for one reason or another.

  • @VAHNeunzehnsechundsiebzig.3618 said:
    I would say Rytlock was the first rev society knew about and who (might) talk about it. There is nothing stopping you creating a head cannon where your rev was an ordinary warrior who had a near death experience - and then was silent about it, for one reason or another.

    I always had a head cannon where right after exiting the dream, my character was pulled into the mists. He felt right at home, and thought it was the "real world." Until he encountered an enemy wvw zerg. Having not seen much combat, he barely got away with his life, but entered Tyria where he was pulled away. Then the real canon story happens =D