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How old are you? (take 2)

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  • Esquilax.3491Esquilax.3491 Member ✭✭✭

    Looking at the 10-19 range, we may have just discovered why this game's community is so much nicer than other games :tongue:

  • Ben K.6238Ben K.6238 Member ✭✭✭✭

    The lower number of 10-19 respondents likely has something to do with this:

    @Rasimir.6239 said:
    Not everyone comes to the forum. In my family, three of us are playing GW2, mostly on a daily basis. I'm the only one that posts on (or even reads the) forums. There's an age difference of 36 years between the oldest and youngest of us, so no matter where I put my vote, the outcome will not reflect the whole household but only one part of it.

    Btw, in my (casual) guild there is an age difference of 53 years between the oldest and youngest member ;) .

    Thinking about the type of behaviour I see on forums compared to Facebook, it seems plausible to me that teenage and younger players don't use forums these days. Most of us who are fond of forums could remember using them for at least 10 years (and maybe some even remember newsgroups).

    Ironically, the game chat format is based on IRC, which is older still.

  • MarkoNS.3261MarkoNS.3261 Member ✭✭✭

    Hmm i expected most of the people to be 10-19 range how strange.

  • Laurie.1698Laurie.1698 Member ✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    @Blood Red Arachnid.2493 said:

    @Laurie.1698 said:
    odd, I saw someone saying "if you were born before 1980 then you think MMO's are childish" I was born way before 80's, in fact, graduated high school in the early 80's. I played Atari, heck I even played pong on the TV when that was a great thing. There were no computers in my school at all, not the library, not anywhere. Most of early college too. I am and have been a server engineer for over 20yrs now. I played Daggerfall for hours on end, UO (Ultima Online), I love the MMO genre and came from the early days. I don't think its childish at all. "I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.' C.S. Lewis. Being female, it was a little bit more difficult back then to not be labeled "receptionist" or things like that, and gaming and computer work? well, sometimes we were not as welcome as we are now in this time period. I am glad for that. I will always have fun in MMO's, I love the time I get to spend having fun with computers instead of work on them all the time. Staves off the burn out and always brings loud laughter and big smiles when I get to play.

    If you are going to respond to something I am saying, please quote me directly so I am notified. Anyway, I am speaking in generalities. If you are looking for exceptions you'll find plenty, but when looking at the market as a whole the exceptions aren't as important as the mean flow. There is a certain age window in which our expectations are normalized, and if we aren't in the window then we aren't going to get it. I'm an obtuse person who has experiences in a lot of places, and I can definitely tell you that outside of our current age demographic and closely knit social circle, things like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Inhumans are the silliest things ever.

    As for whether or not it is childish, that is a much bigger debate. My short answer is yes.

    One sentence did not require a quote in my opinion...I'm sorry I responded and used one sentence of your previous message. I don't follow marketing nor do I care to, I'll leave that to the already over-saturated "marketing" field. My age has not normalized, nor has it changed my point of view. My circle consists of 20 somethings to 80 somethings, sometimes younger depending on who's kids are there when I visit and I guess I don't have a demographic circle nor a close knit social circle of any type of age demographic at all. Nothing is childish to me...life is too short to do that to myself. I don't debate. Its only my opinion. I have lived in 17 countries, 40 states, I contract for myself installing servers and networks for hotels, businesses, companies. I guess I will never fit anyone's demographic. I don't have a window, a door, or a circle. I have never had what some consider a "normal" life nor do I want to have one. Black swans should always be considered when observing anything, however, their opinions are just that, opinions. I'll leave it at that .

  • Daddicus.6128Daddicus.6128 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Manasa Devi.7958 said:

    @Endless Soul.5178 said:
    49 here. I still remember when my mom brought home our first video game...PONG.

    I played Pong on the deluxe cocktail table version in a hotel lounge till my eyes went square during one particularly rainy holiday when I was young. There was little else to do, Space Invaders hadn't come out yet.

    Oy! I REMEMBER those! I had forgotten all about them until your post.

    Yeah, I played one they had on campus, I think. It was always crashing, but it was almost the size of a ping-pong table. (Well, to my memory, anyhow!)

    Thanks for the memory boost!

  • Daddicus.6128Daddicus.6128 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Now, no fighting, children, or I'll have to send you to bed without supper.

    :)

  • juhani.5361juhani.5361 Member ✭✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    @Blood Red Arachnid.2493 said:

    @Laurie.1698 said:
    odd, I saw someone saying "if you were born before 1980 then you think MMO's are childish" I was born way before 80's, in fact, graduated high school in the early 80's. I played Atari, heck I even played pong on the TV when that was a great thing. There were no computers in my school at all, not the library, not anywhere. Most of early college too. I am and have been a server engineer for over 20yrs now. I played Daggerfall for hours on end, UO (Ultima Online), I love the MMO genre and came from the early days. I don't think its childish at all. "I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.' C.S. Lewis. Being female, it was a little bit more difficult back then to not be labeled "receptionist" or things like that, and gaming and computer work? well, sometimes we were not as welcome as we are now in this time period. I am glad for that. I will always have fun in MMO's, I love the time I get to spend having fun with computers instead of work on them all the time. Staves off the burn out and always brings loud laughter and big smiles when I get to play.

    If you are going to respond to something I am saying, please quote me directly so I am notified. Anyway, I am speaking in generalities. If you are looking for exceptions you'll find plenty, but when looking at the market as a whole the exceptions aren't as important as the mean flow. There is a certain age window in which our expectations are normalized, and if we aren't in the window then we aren't going to get it. I'm an obtuse person who has experiences in a lot of places, and I can definitely tell you that outside of our current age demographic and closely knit social circle, things like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Inhumans are the silliest things ever.

    As for whether or not it is childish, that is a much bigger debate. My short answer is yes.

    Do you have any evidence for your assertion? Because if I'm seeing anything here in this thread, it's that there are quite a few of us born before 1980 who are playing this game. I'm not saying that expectations don't get normalized, or that if you miss a trend when it's at critical mass, you probably won't ever "get" it-- heck, Twitter's beyond me even though I first signed up for an account when it was in beta.

    Editing: Not trying to start an argument, BTW. I'm honestly curious. I've been reading a lot about game design and theory lately. Gaming psychology is fascinating :) Marketing can be too.

    Personally, I'm in my mid-40s. I should have been into arcade games, etc., but I had horrible reflexes when I was a kid. I got into gaming when my husband dropped a copy of Dungeon Siege in my lap sometime in 2004. I got addicted to the world of Aranna, then KOTORs I & 2, then Dragon Age: Origins and the rest of the Bioware stable, including SWTOR. It seems like single player, party-based, non-nostalgic games are dying (I loved you, ME:A!). MMORPGs are the closest thing out there to what I enjoy playing, so here I am!

    I'd kill for a tactical pause sometimes, though.

  • 60 (be 61 on January 1, yep New Year's baby) here, was around before computers were a common item. Played most of the big name MMOs.

  • Blood Red Arachnid.2493Blood Red Arachnid.2493 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    @juhani.5361 said:
    Do you have any evidence for your assertion? Because if I'm seeing anything here in this thread, it's that there are quite a few of us born before 1980 who are playing this game. I'm not saying that expectations don't get normalized, or that if you miss a trend when it's at critical mass, you probably won't ever "get" it-- heck, Twitter's beyond me even though I first signed up for an account when it was in beta.

    Editing: Not trying to start an argument, BTW. I'm honestly curious. I've been reading a lot about game design and theory lately. Gaming psychology is fascinating :) Marketing can be too.

    Personally, I'm in my mid-40s. I should have been into arcade games, etc., but I had horrible reflexes when I was a kid. I got into gaming when my husband dropped a copy of Dungeon Siege in my lap sometime in 2004. I got addicted to the world of Aranna, then KOTORs I & 2, then Dragon Age: Origins and the rest of the Bioware stable, including SWTOR. It seems like single player, party-based, non-nostalgic games are dying (I loved you, ME:A!). MMORPGs are the closest thing out there to what I enjoy playing, so here I am!

    I'd kill for a tactical pause sometimes, though.

    If you mean "Do I have scientific studies on hand specifically to prove to these things" evidence? No. I don't catalogue everything I see in life. But if you want evidence, just look at the poll results. I can go dig for them, though, as these are not uncommon sentiments that I am echoing.

    I am partly paraphrasing a section of Malcom Gladwells Outliers: The Story of Success, particularly the portion that goes over how 14 of the 75 wealthiest people were born between 1831 and 1840. The reason why is because in the 1870s there was massive economic restructuring in the United States, and everyone who was born before that period weren't capable of handling the paradigm shift.

    To make a comparison, I'm going to take Yu-gi-oh as an example. It is a card game that was popularized when 4kids translated and adopted over a related television show in 2001. The card game itself was released in 2002, following the success of the important cartoon during the Saturday Morning block. To want to play the game you had to have passing familiarity with the show, which would put you squarely in its young boys and teenager demographic. The exact range is unknown, but I'm going to estimate that it is between 8 and 16, as younger kids would have trouble understanding what is going on, and juniors in highschool were "too old for it" to garner interest. In 2002, there wasn't that much alternative media out there. We were in the Playstation 2 era of gaming and most of the internet looked like privately owned geocities pages. Having pieces of cardboard with pictures of dragons on them was still a "thing". But, from beyond that date, several things happened.

    • In 2003, Call of Duty and similar games revolutionized the online gaming scene.
    • In 2004 World of Warcraft hit, essentially creating its own market.
    • In 2005, Youtube was launched.
    • In 2007 the I-phone was dropped.
    • The Saturday morning cartoon block vanished completely.
    • Easily streamed shows meant that production companies no longer had absolute control over what cartoons to import. 4kids went belly up, and aside from a few dubs most people just stream whatever show they want to watch.
    • Action cartoons and cartoons with long running plots lost popularity, replaced by short run episodic quips (I.E. Teen Titans -> Teen Titans GO!, Ben 10 -> Ben 10 2016, etc).

    Every single thing that was in place to make Yu-gi-oh a successful business venture is gone now. Either you were in the age range where you watched the show and became interested in the card game, or you weren't and you missed the boat. Of course there are going to be exceptions, such as parents who watched the show with their kids, or gaming store owners who got into it, or imports from older games. But the general trend is pretty obvious as a whole. If you look too hard at the exception, you'll miss the forest for the trees. Any tree in a forest is going to have its own tale, but there's still a forest all around it.

    The aging hobbies issue is not something that I see in one place. It is something I see in every place. In CCGs, Yu-gi-oh, Magic: The Gathering, Cardfight! Vanguard, all are suffering from the same issue of low sales due to an aging playerbase. Even the gaming juggernaut of WoW is facing a similar problem. There's even fears that the console gaming market might die off, though evidence for it is inconclusive due to wide market movements. Do you like comic books? Well, that medium is dying off, in spite of all the success that their IPs have in other departments. Contrary to popular opinion, it isn't just because Marvel's comic division was taken over by far-left extremists. When it comes to MMOs in general, there is some debate out there on what the normal values should be, since there is no true MMO market. Each game creates its own market. But, it is hard to debate the fact that numbers aren't nearly as high as they were in the past.

    These are all consumption hobbies that I am familiar with, as I am 1/8th couch potato by blood. But it hurts production hobbies, too. But are there as many domestic gardens? Seamstresses? Model makers? Bee Keepers? Mike Rowe talks about The Skills Gap a lot, referencing a change in values of western civilization away from tradesmithing and towards entertainment and academics. I don't have much personal experience on these things, as I am naturally averse to motion, but growing up I noticed a distinct lack of interest in any of these topics among my peers. Hard to imagine, but there was a time when people used to make clothes for fun.

    The concept is really simple to grasp overall. I'm surprised I am getting so much resistance to the notion. As much of a nerd I am, I can't help but have those tiny moments of clarity where I look down from above at all this and see how silly everything is. When I watched the Inhumans premier, there was a moment where I legit felt like a bad person for bothering to even care about the show. Everything in the Inhumans lore is so discordant and stupid that I had a "what the hell am I doing here?" moment while watching it. I'll have to disagree with C.S. Lewis here, and say that self-analysis is a critical part of maturation. Being unaware is a characteristic of youth, and not a good characteristic at that.

    "Self awareness is knowing when you're sitting at the throne of ignorance." --Leo G.

  • juhani.5361juhani.5361 Member ✭✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    @Blood Red Arachnid.2493 said:

    @juhani.5361 said:
    Do you have any evidence for your assertion? Because if I'm seeing anything here in this thread, it's that there are quite a few of us born before 1980 who are playing this game. I'm not saying that expectations don't get normalized, or that if you miss a trend when it's at critical mass, you probably won't ever "get" it-- heck, Twitter's beyond me even though I first signed up for an account when it was in beta.

    Editing: Not trying to start an argument, BTW. I'm honestly curious. I've been reading a lot about game design and theory lately. Gaming psychology is fascinating :) Marketing can be too.

    Personally, I'm in my mid-40s. I should have been into arcade games, etc., but I had horrible reflexes when I was a kid. I got into gaming when my husband dropped a copy of Dungeon Siege in my lap sometime in 2004. I got addicted to the world of Aranna, then KOTORs I & 2, then Dragon Age: Origins and the rest of the Bioware stable, including SWTOR. It seems like single player, party-based, non-nostalgic games are dying (I loved you, ME:A!). MMORPGs are the closest thing out there to what I enjoy playing, so here I am!

    I'd kill for a tactical pause sometimes, though.

    If you mean "Do I have scientific studies on hand specifically to prove to these things" evidence? No. I don't catalogue everything I see in life. But if you want evidence, just look at the poll results. I can go dig for them, though, as these are not uncommon sentiments that I am echoing.

    I am partly paraphrasing a section of Malcom Gladwells Outliers: The Story of Success, particularly the portion that goes over how 14 of the 75 wealthiest people were born between 1831 and 1840. The reason why is because in the 1870s there was massive economic restructuring in the United States, and everyone who was born before that period weren't capable of handling the paradigm shift.

    To make a comparison, I'm going to take Yu-gi-oh as an example. It is a card game that was popularized when 4kids translated and adopted over a related television show in 2001. The card game itself was released in 2002, following the success of the important cartoon during the Saturday Morning block. To want to play the game you had to have passing familiarity with the show, which would put you squarely in its young boys and teenager demographic. The exact range is unknown, but I'm going to estimate that it is between 8 and 16, as younger kids would have trouble understanding what is going on, and juniors in highschool were "too old for it" to garner interest. In 2002, there wasn't that much alternative media out there. We were in the Playstation 2 era of gaming and most of the internet looked like privately owned geocities pages. Having pieces of cardboard with pictures of dragons on them was still a "thing". But, from beyond that date, several things happened.

    • In 2003, Call of Duty and similar games revolutionized the online gaming scene.
    • In 2004 World of Warcraft hit, essentially creating its own market.
    • In 2005, Youtube was launched.
    • In 2007 the I-phone was dropped.
    • The Saturday morning cartoon block vanished completely.
    • Easily streamed shows meant that production companies no longer had absolute control over what cartoons to import. 4kids went belly up, and aside from a few dubs most people just stream whatever show they want to watch.
    • Action cartoons and cartoons with long running plots lost popularity, replaced by short run episodic quips (I.E. Teen Titans -> Teen Titans GO!, Ben 10 -> Ben 10 2016, etc).

    Every single thing that was in place to make Yu-gi-oh a successful business venture is gone now. Either you were in the age range where you watched the show and became interested in the card game, or you weren't and you missed the boat. Of course there are going to be exceptions, such as parents who watched the show with their kids, or gaming store owners who got into it, or imports from older games. But the general trend is pretty obvious as a whole. If you look too hard at the exception, you'll miss the forest for the trees. Any tree in a forest is going to have its own tale, but there's still a forest all around it.

    The aging hobbies issue is not something that I see in one place. It is something I see in every place. In CCGs, Yu-gi-oh, Magic: The Gathering, Cardfight! Vanguard, all are suffering from the same issue of low sales due to an aging playerbase. Even the gaming juggernaut of WoW is facing a similar problem. There's even fears that the console gaming market might die off, though evidence for it is inconclusive due to wide market movements. Do you like comic books? Well, that medium is dying off, in spite of all the success that their IPs have in other departments. Contrary to popular opinion, it isn't just because Marvel's comic division was taken over by far-left extremists. When it comes to MMOs in general, there is some debate out there on what the normal values should be, since there is no true MMO market. Each game creates its own market. But, it is hard to debate the fact that numbers aren't nearly as high as they were in the past.

    These are all consumption hobbies that I am familiar with, as I am 1/8th couch potato by blood. But it hurts production hobbies, too. But are there as many domestic gardens? Seamstresses? Model makers? Bee Keepers? Mike Rowe talks about The Skills Gap a lot, referencing a change in values of western civilization away from tradesmithing and towards entertainment and academics. I don't have much personal experience on these things, as I am naturally averse to motion, but growing up I noticed a distinct lack of interest in any of these topics among my peers. Hard to imagine, but there was a time when people used to make clothes for fun.

    The concept is really simple to grasp overall. I'm surprised I am getting so much resistance to the notion. As much of a nerd I am, I can't help but have those tiny moments of clarity where I look down from above at all this and see how silly everything is. When I watched the Inhumans premier, there was a moment where I legit felt like a bad person for bothering to even care about the show. Everything in the Inhumans lore is so discordant and stupid that I had a "what the hell am I doing here?" moment while watching it. I'll have to disagree with C.S. Lewis here, and say that self-analysis is a critical part of maturation. Being unaware is a characteristic of youth, and not a good characteristic at that.

    You know, I don't think I've seen that Player One blog before (reference to Ready, Player One? Just wondering-- loved that book). I'll have to give it a closer look. Most of my MMO news these days comes from Massively. I'm wondering if there are other causes to MMO population shifts. The market, if anything, seems to be saturated now with a billion new games either in development or early testing. Not to mention, the mobile market might well be chipping away at traditional MMOs. I've played a couple of them-- games like Lineage 2 are close to full-featured on Android. BDO, Blade & Soul, and a few others seem to be taking up a lot of slack from aging Western MMOs. It doesn't help that MMOs keep adopting increasingly predatory monetization practices-- part of the reason I'm here now instead of playing SWTOR ;) I don't think the market has collapsed, exactly, but probably has dispersed among the many options out there. MOBAs and Battle Royale games are chipping away at the audience too.

    Anyway, you've given me a few thoughts for future research. I love following demographic trends :) And I'm dying to know the truth.

    I don't think you're wrong on an overall conceptual level. I think your particulars might be off a bit, however, about gaming or the age of the overall demographic. Gaming in general has a lot of room for expansion: female gamers are a growing demographic. Unfortunately, the industry as a whole seems to be going out of its way to alienate us.

    Anyway, FWIW, enjoy what you enjoy. Don't let anything stop you, especially those "what the hell am I doing here?" thoughts. Sometimes you need your Inhumans or your Bollywood or your K-pop or K-dramas <---sorry, personal add there.

  • Furious.2867Furious.2867 Member ✭✭✭

    @Blood Red Arachnid.2493 said:

    @juhani.5361 said:
    Do you have any evidence for your assertion? Because if I'm seeing anything here in this thread, it's that there are quite a few of us born before 1980 who are playing this game. I'm not saying that expectations don't get normalized, or that if you miss a trend when it's at critical mass, you probably won't ever "get" it-- heck, Twitter's beyond me even though I first signed up for an account when it was in beta.

    Editing: Not trying to start an argument, BTW. I'm honestly curious. I've been reading a lot about game design and theory lately. Gaming psychology is fascinating :) Marketing can be too.

    Personally, I'm in my mid-40s. I should have been into arcade games, etc., but I had horrible reflexes when I was a kid. I got into gaming when my husband dropped a copy of Dungeon Siege in my lap sometime in 2004. I got addicted to the world of Aranna, then KOTORs I & 2, then Dragon Age: Origins and the rest of the Bioware stable, including SWTOR. It seems like single player, party-based, non-nostalgic games are dying (I loved you, ME:A!). MMORPGs are the closest thing out there to what I enjoy playing, so here I am!

    I'd kill for a tactical pause sometimes, though.

    If you mean "Do I have scientific studies on hand specifically to prove to these things" evidence? No. I don't catalogue everything I see in life. But if you want evidence, just look at the poll results. I can go dig for them, though, as these are not uncommon sentiments that I am echoing.

    I am partly paraphrasing a section of Malcom Gladwells Outliers: The Story of Success, particularly the portion that goes over how 14 of the 75 wealthiest people were born between 1831 and 1840. The reason why is because in the 1870s there was massive economic restructuring in the United States, and everyone who was born before that period weren't capable of handling the paradigm shift.

    To make a comparison, I'm going to take Yu-gi-oh as an example. It is a card game that was popularized when 4kids translated and adopted over a related television show in 2001. The card game itself was released in 2002, following the success of the important cartoon during the Saturday Morning block. To want to play the game you had to have passing familiarity with the show, which would put you squarely in its young boys and teenager demographic. The exact range is unknown, but I'm going to estimate that it is between 8 and 16, as younger kids would have trouble understanding what is going on, and juniors in highschool were "too old for it" to garner interest. In 2002, there wasn't that much alternative media out there. We were in the Playstation 2 era of gaming and most of the internet looked like privately owned geocities pages. Having pieces of cardboard with pictures of dragons on them was still a "thing". But, from beyond that date, several things happened.

    • In 2003, Call of Duty and similar games revolutionized the online gaming scene.
    • In 2004 World of Warcraft hit, essentially creating its own market.
    • In 2005, Youtube was launched.
    • In 2007 the I-phone was dropped.
    • The Saturday morning cartoon block vanished completely.
    • Easily streamed shows meant that production companies no longer had absolute control over what cartoons to import. 4kids went belly up, and aside from a few dubs most people just stream whatever show they want to watch.
    • Action cartoons and cartoons with long running plots lost popularity, replaced by short run episodic quips (I.E. Teen Titans -> Teen Titans GO!, Ben 10 -> Ben 10 2016, etc).

    Every single thing that was in place to make Yu-gi-oh a successful business venture is gone now. Either you were in the age range where you watched the show and became interested in the card game, or you weren't and you missed the boat. Of course there are going to be exceptions, such as parents who watched the show with their kids, or gaming store owners who got into it, or imports from older games. But the general trend is pretty obvious as a whole. If you look too hard at the exception, you'll miss the forest for the trees. Any tree in a forest is going to have its own tale, but there's still a forest all around it.

    The aging hobbies issue is not something that I see in one place. It is something I see in every place. In CCGs, Yu-gi-oh, Magic: The Gathering, Cardfight! Vanguard, all are suffering from the same issue of low sales due to an aging playerbase. Even the gaming juggernaut of WoW is facing a similar problem. There's even fears that the console gaming market might die off, though evidence for it is inconclusive due to wide market movements. Do you like comic books? Well, that medium is dying off, in spite of all the success that their IPs have in other departments. Contrary to popular opinion, it isn't just because Marvel's comic division was taken over by far-left extremists. When it comes to MMOs in general, there is some debate out there on what the normal values should be, since there is no true MMO market. Each game creates its own market. But, it is hard to debate the fact that numbers aren't nearly as high as they were in the past.

    These are all consumption hobbies that I am familiar with, as I am 1/8th couch potato by blood. But it hurts production hobbies, too. But are there as many domestic gardens? Seamstresses? Model makers? Bee Keepers? Mike Rowe talks about The Skills Gap a lot, referencing a change in values of western civilization away from tradesmithing and towards entertainment and academics. I don't have much personal experience on these things, as I am naturally averse to motion, but growing up I noticed a distinct lack of interest in any of these topics among my peers. Hard to imagine, but there was a time when people used to make clothes for fun.

    The concept is really simple to grasp overall. I'm surprised I am getting so much resistance to the notion. As much of a nerd I am, I can't help but have those tiny moments of clarity where I look down from above at all this and see how silly everything is. When I watched the Inhumans premier, there was a moment where I legit felt like a bad person for bothering to even care about the show. Everything in the Inhumans lore is so discordant and stupid that I had a "what the hell am I doing here?" moment while watching it. I'll have to disagree with C.S. Lewis here, and say that self-analysis is a critical part of maturation. Being unaware is a characteristic of youth, and not a good characteristic at that.

    A lot has changed in the last 10 years on the web as well. There's FB whose ultimate goal is to consume as much of its user's time as possible for top dollar ad serving. Then there's declining quality of Google search results to favor big brands that pay top dollar (pay AdWords, get a bonus free organic listing) instead of passionate indie owned websites. Lastly, Amazon who wants to control all of the worlds commerce, from distribution of physical and digital goods to manufacturing.

    In the end, consumers lose when there's large market consolidation.

  • Zedek.8932Zedek.8932 Member ✭✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    @PyrateSilly.4710 said:
    I am not only 50 (51 in about 2 weeks) but I am also female. When the kids were younger (they are 31 and 30) we had 3 computers networked in the house so that we could play games together. Now we not only game long distance at times with them but we also game with the granddaughter who will 11 in a week.

    So in effect I am what some would consider an anomaly being both 'old' and 'female'. I have found that I am not that much of an anomaly, there are more of us old and female gamers out there than most would think there are.

    My grandparents also discovered gaming. They play "Dr. Mario" on two gameboys they bought- Maximum level or Columns versus each other for hours. They hooked up that old MegaDrive on their 40" SONY TV just to play that game. It's ready all the time, when I just say "Columns?" someone in the house of them yells "Me!".

    It's indeed not uncommon. They are 70+. Not sure why they do that, they start every puzzle game at maximum difficulty and speed and it sounds like hardcore techno when the bricks drop on-screen. Now they have a tablet and play Flash games. But man, in the 90s, touching the computer made my grandma act like it's going immediately implode her... No she walks into the living room from the kitchen with the 80s gas stove, sits down, and plays Gameboy. Time changes...

  • DarcShriek.5829DarcShriek.5829 Member ✭✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    @PyrateSilly.4710 said:
    I am not only 50 (51 in about 2 weeks) but I am also female. When the kids were younger (they are 31 and 30) we had 3 computers networked in the house so that we could play games together. Now we not only game long distance at times with them but we also game with the granddaughter who will 11 in a week.

    So in effect I am what some would consider an anomaly being both 'old' and 'female'. I have found that I am not that much of an anomaly, there are more of us old and female gamers out there than most would think there are.

    Actually, you're not as anomalous as you think. The majority of what are commonly referred to as casual gamers are female. Also, the age of casual gamers skews older. You're probably still within one deviation of the mean.

  • Torolan.5816Torolan.5816 Member ✭✭✭
    edited December 18, 2017

    My mother is over 60 and loves to play Tetris in all forms and a revised Boulder Dash clone on a tablet she recently got as a gift, but she has no interest in other games. My father is close to 70 and surfs several football and terrible folkmusic sites on the internet like a pro. :)

    I myself prefer being a nerd to holler around in the living room and get drunk while watching football or other "manly" hobbies. A whole football game is a very boring thing, from 90 minutes I am probably entertained for a maximum of 10 minutes. Boxing and MMA are just boring from the start, I am more entertained by professional wrestling. I like Snooker and Darts because these are manly, even gentlemanly things and don´t involve to scream like a madman or babble incoherently when the ball leaves the field.
    I also have moments where i think that I am too old for RPGing, but other men around my age play poker with their friends or buy a fast car for their waning libido. Playing lies in our nature, people learn to supress it when they grow older and most rediscover it when they do not work anymore and have to think about reputation and serious business. Working hard is a rather recent development for having a healthy self esteem. If you worked hard in ancient Greece or Rome and did not have time to visit the circus for a brutal entertainment, show of your military progress, make parties to show of the masks of your revered ancestors, invite the public people for some festivities, enter the vomitorium or your personal garden of lust for some decadence or the forum for some demagogue political action or some hard practiced philosophical discourse you learned from your highly respected greek or roman philosphy teacher, you were considered to be a filthy pleb unfit for the finer art of living.

  • Bish.8627Bish.8627 Member ✭✭✭

    I wonder if this has implications on new players being attracted. Or if the emerging market will play an MMO.

    I did expect to see a lot more teens than that!

  • I have no issues telling people how old I am :/
    33 :D

    Characters - Mesmer Ricoh / Ranger Ricoh / Revenant Ricoh
    [Suggestion] Commander Tag

  • Menadena.7482Menadena.7482 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Daddicus.6128 said:
    By the way, I remember when the Atari 2600 wasn't called the 2600. I think it was Atari Game Console or something like that. We just called it Atari. A friend of mine had one. We all thought his family must be rich.

    Our family bought an intellivision and considered the atari people to be snobs.

    New to the game? Feel free to give a yell if you need PVE help.

  • Menadena.7482Menadena.7482 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Furious.2867 said:

    @Daddicus.6128 said:

    @Pimsley.3681 said:

    @Menadena.7482 said:

    @Pimsley.3681 said:
    I’m not old enough to know but does age affect dexterity and reaction times? I’ve noticed most of the ESL pro gamers from other games are mostly in their 20s.

    Well, younger gamers are all thumbs when they have to move with WASD or arrow keys.

    “all thumbs” is that a UK phrase/idiom? I am American but heard Hyacinth Bucket say it in one of the Keeping up Appearances episode. My parents love that show. It used to be on Netflix

    Nah, I think it's most English-speaking countries. I'm in the USA, and I've used it as long as I can remember. Means "clumsy", I think. (If not, I've been using it wrong for ... well, let's not get into THAT again!)

    Hmm...In the US, maybe it's an older generation or regional phrase? Like from the Midwest or Bible belt area? It's not popular in coastal cities because of its transient nature and how pop-culture dictates the vocabulary. These days, people are just more direct and say, "Gee, you're clumsy AF"

    Edit: But I do like idioms though. It's a more "colorful" use of language. Social media and the instant gratification nature of people these days have killed it.

    Where are you that you have never heard it? It is pretty common on the east coast of the US.

    New to the game? Feel free to give a yell if you need PVE help.

  • Aye.8392Aye.8392 Member ✭✭

    @Pimsley.3681 said:

    @Vayne.8563 said:

    @Pimsley.3681 said:
    I’m not old enough to know but does age affect dexterity and reaction times? I’ve noticed most of the ESL pro gamers from other games are mostly in their 20s.

    Age in most cases, but not all, does affect dexterity. But more than that, it affects stamina and focus, at least in my case. However, since most people don't raid or competitively PvP or WvW, what does it matter?

    I'll be 56 soon and I'm part of the first generation that grew up on video games (admittedly a faint shadow of what they have become today). I'm not going to stop playing just because I'm not interested in killing myself raiding. There's plenty of stuff in this game for a guy like me to do.

    The builds I tend to make aren't meta builds, but they're more fire and forget builds. Phantasm builds on a chronomancer, for example, rather than a shatter build. I still shatter when I can resummon 2 phantasms, but it's not nearly as active. Daredevil is a very very easy build, using staff and dual pistol, for people who want to take it easier and still clear content.

    I tend to stay away from eles and engies, not that I never play them but I don't play them as much or as hard. My engie is using a flame thrower build that works quite nicely that I call fire and forget. lol

    56 is still young. It’s the new 36 haha. First generation gamer? That means you played the Atari 2600? My dad had one!

    I had the Atari 2600. I still have Pong, but no way to hook it to my television now even if I wanted to.

  • Pimsley.3681Pimsley.3681 Member ✭✭✭

    @Aye.8392 said:

    @Pimsley.3681 said:

    @Vayne.8563 said:

    @Pimsley.3681 said:
    I’m not old enough to know but does age affect dexterity and reaction times? I’ve noticed most of the ESL pro gamers from other games are mostly in their 20s.

    Age in most cases, but not all, does affect dexterity. But more than that, it affects stamina and focus, at least in my case. However, since most people don't raid or competitively PvP or WvW, what does it matter?

    I'll be 56 soon and I'm part of the first generation that grew up on video games (admittedly a faint shadow of what they have become today). I'm not going to stop playing just because I'm not interested in killing myself raiding. There's plenty of stuff in this game for a guy like me to do.

    The builds I tend to make aren't meta builds, but they're more fire and forget builds. Phantasm builds on a chronomancer, for example, rather than a shatter build. I still shatter when I can resummon 2 phantasms, but it's not nearly as active. Daredevil is a very very easy build, using staff and dual pistol, for people who want to take it easier and still clear content.

    I tend to stay away from eles and engies, not that I never play them but I don't play them as much or as hard. My engie is using a flame thrower build that works quite nicely that I call fire and forget. lol

    56 is still young. It’s the new 36 haha. First generation gamer? That means you played the Atari 2600? My dad had one!

    I had the Atari 2600. I still have Pong, but no way to hook it to my television now even if I wanted to.

    Good news is that you can finally buy one of these now for nostalgia:

    https://www.amazon.com/Atari-Flashback-Gold-Console-Black-857847003820/dp/B06XWB59H4/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_63_t_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=S4AH63YFH4ZW4K5BQASF

    But GW2 is still my favorite game at the moment :+1:

  • Willhart.8230Willhart.8230 Member ✭✭
    edited December 20, 2017

    I'm 25, which seems to be fairly common looking at the results. Nice to see a lot of older people than me.

  • Furious.2867Furious.2867 Member ✭✭✭

    Are older gamers richer in-game?

  • @Furious.2867 said:
    Are older gamers richer in-game?

    To get any idea of age compared to in-game wealth, you would have to make a pretty detailed survey of players' ages compared to their game wealth. And then you'd need to decide what 'richer' actually means in GW2. Buys lots of gems? Has lots of gold? Has hoarded a ton of mats? Spends a lot? Saves a lot? Owns a ton of gem store items and every available upgrade?

    In the end it comes down to how an individual person chooses to spend their money and/or free time, so I doubt there is a major connection of loot to age group.

  • Just turned 40 in September. Avid gamer since I first started playing text-based adventure game's on my dad's Commodore 64 when I was around 6 years old.

  • Taygus.4571Taygus.4571 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Furious.2867 said:
    Are older gamers richer in-game?

    I would imagine wealth in game would have less to do with age and more to do with time played

  • @Blood Red Arachnid.2493 said:
    Getting the younger generation interest is pretty hard, too. "Hey, Kids! Do you want to play with pieces of cardboard with pictures of dragons on them? It'll only take a week to learn all the rules, but then you can make-believe that you're on an obscure TV show that airs in a foreign nation." I imagine the MMO market is a little easier, but compared to IOS games an MMO seems nigh unassailable. At least I think that's what the kids are doing nowadays.

    There is a young market for card games, simply because cards are collectible. A lot of kids are magpies, it's why children's pockets are famous for being full of odd little things. My niece and nephew love card games. The collection aspect pulls them in.

  • I have played since the chicken crossed the road - Required a tape to load it- My father build with a team the first computer's for a large company in Victoria Australia - They took up a whole large room - Was the space invader Champ back in the day in NSW Australia - Played all the well known games up to date - Gaming - No problem in our household as we both game away- In a game- You Are Forever Young- Cheers :)

  • Torolan.5816Torolan.5816 Member ✭✭✭
    edited December 22, 2017

    It is actally very hard to compete with computers for the attention of children, even with a skritty device of only the size of a matchbox. I always bunk on the ability of their own imagionation and the desire to build something instead of simply consuming it, but the lure of games like Clash Royale is really strong.

    Time and place are also a factor. Where I live, children fall out of the already voluntary daycare when they are around the age of 11. You can be sure that a regular institution of daycare is boring an 11 year old to tears already with their ancient education methods of crafting to keep the fingers busy and listening to elders which they gingerly packed into new clothes and called modern, and most of them are really glad when they can leave them. Next comes open youth care, a place where juveniles have to appear on their own and are basically supervised while doing stuff on their own, an already superior concept that is surprisingly not much aided by the government. This is the first place when you can actually bunk of the children to use their imagination instead of trying to fit in the hamsterwheel that we call school here.

  • SpaceCowboy.5092SpaceCowboy.5092 Member
    edited September 8, 2019

    One of the reasons gw2 is so friendly and people are polite is because there are a lot of older people playing ....less kids .....I recently saw some gw2 content guy on YouTube quit gw2 cos he didn't feel like anyone cared about his videos .....kitten....our kids watch DANTDM....we are not Going to watch a clone of him playing gw2 ....if its not a guide or a nice piece of artwork ....30 to 50 year olds don't care lol ....we don't know what twitch is.....but we all have money to spend cos of our age and spend it on gw2 so the game will last for years xx

  • Laivine.9308Laivine.9308 Member ✭✭✭
    edited September 8, 2019

    I was born in 1977 when Rumors by Fleetwood mac was released (one of the best albums ever :D). My 2 years younger brother got me into gaming . I started with Dune 2000 and I have played since then most of the rts, city builders, tycoon games on the market for thousands upon thousands of hours. He never managed to get me to like rpg games, but then, completely out of coincidence I bought GW Nightfall. That was the start of a new gaming chapter in my life as you can imagine. My hubby is also a gaming geek and we all play GW2 almost daily (including my brother who lives abroad). We now try to convince his wife to join us in game lol. So far she just enjoys the soundtrack though :/
    Cheers!
    xx

  • coso.9173coso.9173 Member ✭✭✭✭

    i'm 38, glad to see there are older people than me playing the game <3

  • Mandatory.6590Mandatory.6590 Member ✭✭
    edited September 8, 2019

    @SpaceCowboy.5092 said:
    One of the reasons gw2 is so friendly and people are polite is because there are a lot of older people playing ....less kids .....I recently saw some gw2 content guy on YouTube quit gw2 cos he didn't feel like anyone cared about his videos .....kitten....our kids watch DANTDM....we are not Going to watch a clone of him playing gw2 ....if its not a guide or a nice piece of artwork ....30 to 50 year olds don't care lol ....we don't know what twitch is.....but we all have money to spend cos of our age and spend it on gw2 so the game will last for years xx

    It's also one of the reasons why anet is looking to expand their portfolio. The majority of their customer base is probably in the group you mentioned. That's like zero future growth.

    Or, most of the younger players don't come to the forums to hang out. They are watching twitch I guess.

  • Goettel.4389Goettel.4389 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Forty-niner, kinda.

  • Interesting that there are a majority in 20-29. That’s actually a very positive thing to see, and not what I expected. It’s nice to see a new generation interested in MMOs.

  • Poll is a bit out-dated, as some will have changed categories in the intervening years.

  • Mandatory.6590Mandatory.6590 Member ✭✭
    edited September 8, 2019

    @Hawken.7932 said:
    Interesting that there are a majority in 20-29. That’s actually a very positive thing to see, and not what I expected. It’s nice to see a new generation interested in MMOs.

    It's actually only the largest group on this poll. We don't know how that is divided either, but a majority of the players are 30 and up if you total it.(for this pole and depending on how you want to group it) if I look at it, under 30 or over 30, who is the majority?

    I feel like the the first 2 groups don't respond because they don't come to forums. So, it's an unknown but likely a mirror to the right side of the third group.

  • We got the game, about a year and a half ago, for my wife as she missed playing fantasy MMOs but it turned out that the motion gave her nausea like so many such games these days. I hadn't wanted to play this game as it was owned by NCSoft and I was a CoH exile who'd still not forgiven. I set up an account anyway to help her out and in the short time we played I (natural) got hooked. I'm 51 my wife is 5 year younger and our daughter, who has played almost as long is almost 12. I don't feel like I'm going to be stopping playing games anytime soon and I know my wife badly misses playing fantasy style games, MMO or single player and it seems like our daughter is really into it as she enjoyed running around in SWL with me and has really enjoyed jumping into the resurrected CoH. Still, GW2 is currently her fave as she loves running around as an Asura along with the TINY guild.

  • Social engineering... would you be willing to give this info to a guy claiming to be an Foreign Prince in an email?

    If that answer is No, it should be no here too

  • ugrakarma.9416ugrakarma.9416 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 8, 2019

    im bit curious about extremes those ppl with 80+ playing GW2. i wonder whos is our oldest player.

    main pvp: Khel the Undead(power reaper).

  • Ashantara.8731Ashantara.8731 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @OriOri.8724 said:
    I loved the new one and loved the old one, and was born quite a bit before 2016. Just because you didn't like it doens't means that no one is allowed to like both.

    Ghostbusters 2 was already a pretty bad movie in my book, and I loved its prequel - but nowadays there are 99% bad remakes of classics, or new sequels of classics that are also 99% badly written and unnecessary (like the industry lacks creative minds to come up with something original amidst the surfeit of new films each year).

  • i am old enough to remember LEGO being good, 70s music and Star Wars only consisting of 3 films.

  • Mil.3562Mil.3562 Member ✭✭✭

    How do you vote? I don't see a link. Anyway, i am not shy to tell my age, to me it's nothing personal. But, maybe in 10 ~ 20 years time, I'll think differently lol

  • Ultramex.1506Ultramex.1506 Member ✭✭✭

    The question is....who voted 0-9 years old and 80 years old?

  • Donari.5237Donari.5237 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @spjones.1528 said:
    We got the game, about a year and a half ago, for my wife as she missed playing fantasy MMOs but it turned out that the motion gave her nausea like so many such games these days. I hadn't wanted to play this game as it was owned by NCSoft and I was a CoH exile who'd still not forgiven. I set up an account anyway to help her out and in the short time we played I (natural) got hooked. I'm 51 my wife is 5 year younger and our daughter, who has played almost as long is almost 12. I don't feel like I'm going to be stopping playing games anytime soon and I know my wife badly misses playing fantasy style games, MMO or single player and it seems like our daughter is really into it as she enjoyed running around in SWL with me and has really enjoyed jumping into the resurrected CoH. Still, GW2 is currently her fave as she loves running around as an Asura along with the TINY guild.

    I am also super prone to motion sickness but I avoid it in GW2 via camera settings (wide FoV, high zoom, etc). I've posted them before, not sure which forums, if you think it might help then PM me for details. It'd be great if your wife could join you in Tyria.

  • Im 25, considered playing this game for some time before but never really got around it any sooner

  • SunTzu.4513SunTzu.4513 Member ✭✭✭

    Greetings,

    i'm 33 years old, but i feel and sometimes i act like i'm around 20+. Most people are thinking im around 20 even with my year long grown full beard i seem to look pretty young. If i shave it i woul look like 16 years old :-)

  • Dante.1508Dante.1508 Member ✭✭✭

    Usually casual polls like this do tend to be accurate of the over all masses, even if its a small sample size. Most people tend to be honest when the polls are just for fun.

  • Rasimir.6239Rasimir.6239 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Donari.5237 said:

    @spjones.1528 said:
    We got the game, about a year and a half ago, for my wife as she missed playing fantasy MMOs but it turned out that the motion gave her nausea like so many such games these days. I hadn't wanted to play this game as it was owned by NCSoft and I was a CoH exile who'd still not forgiven. I set up an account anyway to help her out and in the short time we played I (natural) got hooked. I'm 51 my wife is 5 year younger and our daughter, who has played almost as long is almost 12. I don't feel like I'm going to be stopping playing games anytime soon and I know my wife badly misses playing fantasy style games, MMO or single player and it seems like our daughter is really into it as she enjoyed running around in SWL with me and has really enjoyed jumping into the resurrected CoH. Still, GW2 is currently her fave as she loves running around as an Asura along with the TINY guild.

    I am also super prone to motion sickness but I avoid it in GW2 via camera settings (wide FoV, high zoom, etc). I've posted them before, not sure which forums, if you think it might help then PM me for details. It'd be great if your wife could join you in Tyria.

    Same here. I remember back when Wizardry 8 and Ultima Underworld were new, I sooo wanted to play them and couldn't play either due to motion sickness. There are elements in GW2 that I have to be careful around (mount movement especially), but mostly camera settings can be tweaked so that it rarely is a problem (unlike ESO for example). Turning off post processing and turning down shadows and reflextions are other things (in addition to FoV and zoom) that have a huge impact on whether I have problems with GW2 or not.

  • Rasimir.6239Rasimir.6239 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Rasimir.6239 said:

    @Rpgtabbycat.5869 said:
    I'm honestly surprised there aren't more teenagers playing. I'm not a teen but I just find that statistic interesting. Also surprised by the number of pre-teens. I thought that count would be 0.

    Not everyone comes to the forum. In my family, three of us are playing GW2, mostly on a daily basis. I'm the only one that posts on (or even reads the) forums. There's an age difference of 36 years between the oldest and youngest of us, so no matter where I put my vote, the outcome will not reflect the whole household but only one part of it.

    Btw, in my (casual) guild there is an age difference of 53 years between the oldest and youngest member ;) .

    Update after a year and a half: since my husband finally started playing GW2, the age range in our family now spans 46 years across 4 players (two teenagers, two "oldies"). That said I'm still pretty much the only one participating on the forums.