[Spoiler] Final Instance "Be My Guest" — Guild Wars 2 Forums

[Spoiler] Final Instance "Be My Guest"

Hey

So very simple question Joko mentioned "breaking out some crystals" in the final instance what was he referring to Is it the crystal scattered around the map that award volatile magic when broken or was he referring to something we have yet to see.

Tagged:

Comments

  • "the crystal" is a phrase that usually would refer to fancy tableware, usually cups but also plates, bowls and platters, that you'd put out when guests are over, or for a special occasion. Whether that was meant as a double meaning relating to the map crystals, kralkatorrik, or something else entirely, I'm not sure.

  • Ashabhi.1365Ashabhi.1365 Member ✭✭✭

    I don't remember the exact words he said but if he said "The crystal," then I would believe tableware, but if he said "The crystals (plural)" then I would think something more to do with Kralkatorric. I think there's a link there that has yet to be explored, and I don't think he's gone. Aurene only ate his corporeal form. If he's immortal and undead (we saw him in the underworld) then he isn't really gone, just one form of him is.

  • It was singular, "breaking out the crystal", so I took it as a joke on welcoming us in to his trap. It also works as a joke on Branded etc, which fits Joko's humor.

  • DiogoSilva.7089DiogoSilva.7089 Member ✭✭✭

    @Jessica Price.1649 said:
    "Breaking out the crystal" in terms of setting up a formal get-together (metaphorically, the linen tablecloths, fine silver, china, crystal stemware, etc., the whole kit and caboodle).

    As a (yet amateur) fantasy fiction writer myself, one thing I've noticed about the fantasy genre is that we writers have to be extra careful when adding metaphors to our work. Some of them can be too easily interpreted as literal.

    What can be seen as poetic imagery in normal fiction can be interpreted as world building in fantasy fiction.

  • DiogoSilva.7089DiogoSilva.7089 Member ✭✭✭
    edited July 5, 2018

    @DiogoSilva.7089 said:

    @Jessica Price.1649 said:
    "Breaking out the crystal" in terms of setting up a formal get-together (metaphorically, the linen tablecloths, fine silver, china, crystal stemware, etc., the whole kit and caboodle).

    As a (yet amateur) fantasy fiction writer myself, one thing I've noticed about the fantasy genre is that we writers have to be extra careful when adding metaphors to our work. Some of them can be too easily interpreted as literal.

    What can be seen as poetic imagery in normal fiction can be interpreted as world building in fantasy fiction.

    Because my post was quoted amidst the recent reddit drama, I want to clarify what I meant.

    Maybe I've worded it poorly, but all I wanted to say was that, based on my own experience writing fantasy (despite not having published anything yet), I've came to realize that metaphors are tricky to handle in this genre, because they can be easily interpreted as literal (thus causing confusion on the readers/ audience).

    I never had any intention to sound arrogant.

  • Randulf.7614Randulf.7614 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @DiogoSilva.7089 said:
    @DiogoSilva.7089 said:

    @Jessica Price.1649 said:
    "Breaking out the crystal" in terms of setting up a formal get-together (metaphorically, the linen tablecloths, fine silver, china, crystal stemware, etc., the whole kit and caboodle).

    As a (yet amateur) fantasy fiction writer myself, one thing I've noticed about the fantasy genre is that we writers have to be extra careful when adding metaphors to our work. Some of them can be too easily interpreted as literal.

    What can be seen as poetic imagery in normal fiction can be interpreted as world building in fantasy fiction.

    Because my post was quoted amidst the recent reddit drama, I want to clarify what I meant.

    Maybe I've worded it poorly, but all I wanted to say was that, based on my own experience writing fantasy (despite not having published anything yet), I've came to realize that metaphors are tricky to handle in this genre, because they can be easily interpreted as literal (thus causing confusion on the readers/ audience).

    I never had any intention to sound arrogant.

    Nothing in your post implied such in the slightest. Given that many players look for things too often hidden beneath the surface which go far beyond reasonable speculation, what you say in that context is true. Realistically though, the only troubled ground for using metaphors is that this is a global game and non-English native speakers will be playing it in English and will often misconstrue what we would often overlook at common sayings.
    That's ultimately a decision that only the writers can decide if the use is appropriate.

    What sleep is here? What dreams there are in the unctuous coiling of the snakes mortal shuffling. weapon in my hand. My hand the arcing deathblow at the end of all things. The horror. The horror. I embrace it. . .

  • Jzaku.9765Jzaku.9765 Member ✭✭

    @Jessica Price.1649 said:

    @DiogoSilva.7089 said:

    @Jessica Price.1649 said:
    "Breaking out the crystal" in terms of setting up a formal get-together (metaphorically, the linen tablecloths, fine silver, china, crystal stemware, etc., the whole kit and caboodle).

    As a (yet amateur) fantasy fiction writer myself, one thing I've noticed about the fantasy genre is that we writers have to be extra careful when adding metaphors to our work. Some of them can be too easily interpreted as literal.

    What can be seen as poetic imagery in normal fiction can be interpreted as world building in fantasy fiction.

    Idioms are a standard part of English.

    I, and quite a lot of my predominantly english-speaking guild, thought Joko was talking about some kind of magical artifact due to the proximity of Kralkatorrik in the world, and Mesmer magic in the instance. So I agree with that guy that the metaphor used here was quite a miss.

  • castlemanic.3198castlemanic.3198 Member ✭✭✭

    @Jessica Price.1649 said:
    "Breaking out the crystal" in terms of setting up a formal get-together (metaphorically, the linen tablecloths, fine silver, china, crystal stemware, etc., the whole kit and caboodle).

    I'll be honest, I totally thought this meant the skill signet. Thanks for the clarification.

    If you join a debate and provide little to no proof when the other side provides lots of evidence, you can't then declare yourself the winner of that debate. Veterans can make signatures apparently.

  • DiogoSilva.7089DiogoSilva.7089 Member ✭✭✭
    edited July 5, 2018

    @Boris Losdindawoods.3098 said:
    It gets especially difficult when it's assumed that an American English phrase, or worse a regional America English phrase, has a specific, defined meaning. If somebody from the midwest US says, "I'll have a pop", people from the midwest hand them a Coke or Pepsi or some other soda. People from the US, but not from the midwest, are just as likely to have no idea what they're talking about. For somebody who learned English as a second (third? fourth?) language, it's complete nonsense.

    Yes, idioms are usually context-sensitive, so for a global game, many different players will not be able to grasp their meaning even if they speak english perfectly well. There's always the solution to look up on the internet, but that'll only happen if we figure out that it's a metaphor in the first place - and that's where the fantasy genre kicks in and messes things further.

    So in this specific case, we have a "crystal" metaphor whose meaning is context-sensitive in a game filled with literal magic crystals everywhere, right after a scene where our necromancer villain is shown using mesmer magic somehow.

  • ReaverKane.7598ReaverKane.7598 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 5, 2018

    @DiogoSilva.7089 said:

    @Boris Losdindawoods.3098 said:
    It gets especially difficult when it's assumed that an American English phrase, or worse a regional America English phrase, has a specific, defined meaning. If somebody from the midwest US says, "I'll have a pop", people from the midwest hand them a Coke or Pepsi or some other soda. People from the US, but not from the midwest, are just as likely to have no idea what they're talking about. For somebody who learned English as a second (third? fourth?) language, it's complete nonsense.

    Yes, idioms are usually context-sensitive, so for a global game, many different players will not be able to grasp their meaning even if they speak english perfectly well. There's always the solution to look up on the internet, but that'll only happen if we figure out that it's a metaphor in the first place - and that's where the fantasy genre kicks in and messes things further.

    So in this specific case, we have a "crystal" metaphor whose meaning is context-sensitive in a game filled with literal magic crystals everywhere, right after a scene where our necromancer villain is shown using mesmer magic somehow.

    I'm Portuguese and i understood it. Within the context of the phrase it makes sense. Of course i also imagined he could be doing some veiled reference to kralkatorrik or even Aurene to be paid-off later, as a double entendre.

  • Haleydawn.3764Haleydawn.3764 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I understood the phrase when I heard it.
    I can see how a player who isn’t a native English speaker would misconstrue it though.

    The above was written as part of an attempt to waste time.

©2010–2018 ArenaNet, LLC. All rights reserved. Guild Wars, Guild Wars 2, Heart of Thorns, Guild Wars 2: Path of Fire, ArenaNet, NCSOFT, the Interlocking NC Logo, and all associated logos and designs are trademarks or registered trademarks of NCSOFT Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.