Content Creators — Guild Wars 2 Forums

Content Creators

Hey all, so I am a content creator i have made content for Elderscrolls online as well as guildwars 2 and there is one really large thing i have noticed, the content creators in gw2 don't really get much love from the players of the game.... they USED too tho, as i'm going through and looking at some of the older videos from gw people had 20k 100k 200k views on videos now looking at some of the newer content creators.... excluding the ones we all really know like cellofrag, shorts, noody, and more.... people have roughly 100- maybe 2k views at most with the occasional 5-10k.

My question is why does it seem the community isn't really supportive of the content creators from the newer generation? -newer generation being like post PoF or just before PoF

I had watched a WoW stream from Azmongold and he pointed out that guildwars doesn't really seem to be involved in the community outside of the game itself, which is something i noticed as i scroll through some of the videos on youtube old/new

this is a genuine question not a troll question.

What could we as content creators do to spark interest of the community?

What is it you guys look for in a content creator?

What can we do to be better creators?

is there something that you guys expect that content creators are not really doing well of?

Thanks for all the people who take time when reading this hope it sparks some positive feedback.

Comments

  • DeanBB.4268DeanBB.4268 Member ✭✭✭

    I only go looking for a video when a text/pictures guide doesn't work for me. Stuff like jumping puzzles, achievements, etc. Maybe a build, but watching someone play on a video doesn't really help me too much if I'm not already familiar with the skills being used. Plus, there's too much distraction in the video to track what skills are being used and when -- at least for me.

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  • CeNedro.7560CeNedro.7560 Member ✭✭✭

    Gw2-Gameplayvideos are not interessting to watch, since it only shows things I prefer to experience myself. I really like to watch videos about things that are related to Gw2 but cannot be experienced ingame like diskussions, conspiracy theories, alternative endings, fan art, ...
    Though this kind of content(when it's well done) takes a lot more effort than a gameplayvideo or a guide, so they're pretty rare and difficult to find...

  • Haishao.6851Haishao.6851 Member ✭✭✭

    What could we as content creators do to spark interest of the community?

    Do something that isn't already done better by someone else. If you have to ask what you have to do, you probably wont make it, though.

    What is it you guys look for in a content creator?

    I look for content, not "content creators"

    What can we do to be better creators?

    Create better content?

    is there something that you guys expect that content creators are not really doing well of?

    I don't expect anything from "content creator" other than actually useful and properly presented content.

  • AgentMoore.9453AgentMoore.9453 Member ✭✭✭

    As others have stated, the game is much better played than observed which is why the most popular content falls under two categories:

    • Guides: Direct content walkthroughs with no introduction from the creator, visual guides like maps and screenshots (Dulfy does this well), videos showing time-efficient routes for map completion, node gathering, manual gold farming, and other objectives.
    • Nuance: Comedic playthroughs of content with artificial limiters (everyone must use the same armor/weapon, no mounts allowed, etc.), collections of NPC dialogue and interactions that are uncommon or rare that many players might not even know about, studies of lore with examples from both GW1 and GW2 to support the ideas just to name a few.

    The goal here is to provide concise tactics or easy access to things a player won't casually run into in the course of playing. Guides and lore videos of raid content, for example, are a good look at both categories.

  • Faaris.8013Faaris.8013 Member ✭✭✭✭

    What kind of content are you creating and how would it be implemented into the game? I know people who have created stuff for games as mods, which could actually be used by other players. But GW2 does not support content creation, so I guess your journey ends here.

  • sinsrock.1702sinsrock.1702 Member ✭✭

    @Faaris.8013 said:
    What kind of content are you creating and how would it be implemented into the game? I know people who have created stuff for games as mods, which could actually be used by other players. But GW2 does not support content creation, so I guess your journey ends here.

    most of what i have made so far are game play montages, which from what it seems is in itself why they dont get as much love, so far a lot of points have been made that i didnt really think of :) im glad i made this post and look forward to seeing more of what people have to say, i feel like "wooden potatoes" has really dont what most of the above comments really has done, not much for me to do on lore etc due to this i dont think my content will end with this discussion but it may not be as much for guildwars "some still of course" thank you guys all for the input i think i learned a lot from it :)! you all are great! :D

  • AlexxxDelta.1806AlexxxDelta.1806 Member ✭✭✭

    One can only speculate, but I can think of a couple reasons.

    It could be that this game's visual style is not very stream-friendly. Too fast, with too many flashy visuals, resulting in a clutter of lights and colors. Not the best for an observer trying to follow the action.

    The second would be this game's primary audience. Most streamers tend to focus on the competitive/hardcore side of MMOs, while this game's playerbase is mostly into casual pve. So, while a streamer/youtuber could find audience among this game's raid or pvp crowd, it probably won't be as large as in other MMOs.

    It's also possible that ESO is a more popular mmo at the moment. Although I doubt that would be the sole reason for that big of a difference in viewers, as the one described here. It's probably a combination of factors.

  • Trise.2865Trise.2865 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Here's a few things I've noticed, regarding GW2's "creator" community:

    -I haven't seen any quality PvP casting videos since TotalBiscuit played in the Beta.
    -I haven't seen a single high-quality RP, either comedic or dramatic. Well-edited, and often well-choreographed ones, certainly, but still heavily lacking in acting and storyboard. ("Why, oh why can't anyone see how much angst I'm feeling because of how great I am?" ugh...)
    -Lore videos are all well and good, but that niche is already full by the likes of WoodenPotatoes. By all means do try, but be prepared for heavy competition.
    -Fan art collection galleries, again, is all well and good, but this time you're competing directly with the Guild Wars 2 channel. It might be more mutually beneficial working on a freelance deal, where they buy your collection videos to feature on their shows, like Guild Chat.
    -GW 2 Raid/Dungeon videos are just as boring as other games' raid videos, and not even live streamers have bothered trying to make raiding look interesting or fun. I'm not saying it can't be done, merely that it hasn't.
    -Fan-made content has seen a significant decline since the collapse of GuildMag, and organizing a new collective may be necessary.

    If we want ANet to step up their game, then we must step up ours.

  • Yamazuki.6073Yamazuki.6073 Member ✭✭✭

    @Faaris.8013 said:
    What kind of content are you creating and how would it be implemented into the game? I know people who have created stuff for games as mods, which could actually be used by other players. But GW2 does not support content creation, so I guess your journey ends here.

    Content isn't just stuff to add to the games, they're referring to videos and/or streamers who make videos or stream, which creates communities and brings attention to the game for more people to be drawn to it. This is why more games offer rewards through Twitch Prime and pay streamers/youtubers to stream/create videos of their games. These people are considered content creators as streams/videos are content.

  • sorudo.9054sorudo.9054 Member ✭✭✭✭

    i am a hobby game designer since i was 16 and i could tell you why from my perspective, it's quite simple really.

    Anet used to be the pinnacle of new ideas, even their first few trailers were movie worthy.
    However, that boat has sailed long ago, they broke promises and made the game more and more for the long term grinders.
    now you might think this has nothing to do with their trailers but, just think about who would watch the trailers.
    exactly, the very same players that normally wait with anticipation for the new update moved on to other games, games worth their time.
    you can't exactly run a game when players start to turn their back on you, the same goes for content creators,, you need ppl to watch them in order to appreciate them.

    i personally think that they are getting better at in-game scenarios but their trailers and videos are on quite a quality decline, that's one thing they really need to do something about.
    think of it this way, if that same company that betrayed you shows a commercial, you're more likely to throw a fit or zap to a different channel rather then watch it all out.

  • Psycoprophet.8107Psycoprophet.8107 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Build videos,tips for each class etc for pvp and pve modes were the vids I mostly watched as their helpful anytime a player starts a new toon or the game in general. Like every one said watching gameplay gets boring fast in this game. If combat was more strategic based and not power crept spam fest i think gw2 combat could have been fun to watch.

  • zaswer.5246zaswer.5246 Member ✭✭

    I think the problem is how te content is made and what content you choose.
    For example if you choose to make a video about a guide how would you do it?
    Most of the people just show the build and do the rota in the golem with music and they dont talk.
    If you want to catch attention you need to talk to entertain .Im not learning how a build works watching a sc video i have to read the rota and put the video in slow mode so if you explained the build , give tips and even make off meta build tries ,being friendly and honest,you would surely catch more attencion .
    For pve and wvw its the same .Dont rush to action take things calmly and show the content bit by bit ,yes you could do a video in 10 min but you can make it 20 min go slower and entertain more.Thats what you want entertain and show the game
    So to sum up go slower enjoy making the video and interact with your viewers.
    Good luck.

  • I don't watch a lot of YouTube videos about Guild Wars to be honest.
    I've tried at the beginning to look at some tips videos from some of the most known content creators in the Guild Wars community but one thing that made me stop is that they tend to stretch the videos as much as they can.
    And you end up watching a 20 minutes video that could should be 5 to 10 minutes long.

    I quickly switched to articles as it's much faster and easier to get the informations you need.

    As for just watching gameplay? Well, I find little to no interest in watching someone else playing a game I own honestly.

    Maybe there's also the fact that Guild Wars 2 is free (at least the base game). So if a new player watch a video and find it interesting, he can just go play himself and doesn't really have any reason to watch any other videos.

  • Leo.3428Leo.3428 Member ✭✭

    As a beginner I run away from walk through videos and the wiki, because I want to explore and discover.
    Competitive game play videos are generally only mildly interesting, often incomprehensible to me (as a beginner, again), unless the authors talk over it and explain what they and the other players are doing and why - not "using skill 4 because cool" but rather "anticipating X to attack Y and get cooldown on ability Z, so positioning at A to LoS and... etc..."
    I'm a sucker for parody videos though, they help relieve the frustrations :P
    HTH

  • Mewcifer.5198Mewcifer.5198 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I used to watch at least one content creator regularly and I stopped because, well, honestly their content stopped being worth watching. It was like they stopped putting any effort into what they made.

    There is a lack of quality content creators for GW2. What we need is just more people going out there and making content about the game and people sharing that content.

    My list of suggestions for GW2
    Akkebi | Akkebyyon | Alister Kebi | Akkebi Revi | Akkebi Mememachine | Occultist Lulu | Shadow Stalker Lulu| Bonebreaker Lulu
    Max Masteries | 16k AP

  • @Mewcifer.5198 said:
    I used to watch at least one content creator regularly and I stopped because, well, honestly their content stopped being worth watching. It was like they stopped putting any effort into what they made.

    There is a lack of quality content creators for GW2. What we need is just more people going out there and making content about the game and people sharing that content.

    Same here, I used to watch WP, but some time after PoF he just started to feel disconnected from the franchise.

    Golemancer Tixx - Far Shiverpeaks (EU). Achievement Hunter (+35k) ~750 on the AP Leaderboards.

  • sinsrock.1702sinsrock.1702 Member ✭✭

    this is an awesome thread so far, thank you all for the feedback so far ! looking forward to seeing more.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Faaris.8013 said:
    What kind of content are you creating and how would it be implemented into the game? I know people who have created stuff for games as mods, which could actually be used by other players. But GW2 does not support content creation, so I guess your journey ends here.

    Content creators is a term used by sites like Twitch and Youtube to refer to their users - the people who create the content other users go there to see. It's relevant to their business model because a website which doesn't produce any of it's own content was fairly unusual before social media came along (which wasn't that long ago, even in tech terms).

    For some reason it's caught on as a general term for people who make fan videos, online fan art and similar things - but they're still creating content for 3rd party sites, not for the game itself.

    "Hard knocks, bad luck, been knocked down,
    You got back up, rise up, shine on, keep on fighting, the war is almost done...But then I hear you're gone.
    I feel, when the lights go down, you are still here, all you hold dear remains.
    Your star never fades."

  • Pifil.5193Pifil.5193 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I mostly watch WoodenPotatoes, WorldofEnders (Bootts), Nike and Deroir because they produce good, entertaining videos. WP produces excellent videos on a wide variety of subjects the others normally bring out good build guides.

    I used to watch others but most of them stopped producing videos over the years or moved onto other games for one reason or another some probably still stream but I'm not that interested in streaming TBH.

  • Haleydawn.3764Haleydawn.3764 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited June 5, 2019

    I don’t watch any content creators for video games, bar one. I only watch this person (YouTube, so not streamed) when he plays Indy games for his hilarious commentary, so it’s not actually the gameplay I’m watching for. I’d much rather play games myself than watch somebody play.

    So, basically, comedy will make me watch.

    Better get a wriggle on.

  • Fatherbliss.4701Fatherbliss.4701 Member ✭✭✭

    I've done research for my own business purposes on this topic and generally content comes down to a few key varieties:
    1. Humorous
    2. Highly competitive best in class play
    3. Instructional - guides, walk through videos. Showing people how to complete some task
    4. Entertaining - Huge category with a number of variables

    Factor in age of the player base in a game. Gender split. Life cycle of the game and overall fan base on something like YouTube or Twitch. Even specific Anet streams for their own content don't generate a ton of views. So I think you've got some angles you could potentially explore but its going to be a struggle to get noticed. As others have said I'd watch a themed event, something with heavy good or comedic role play. Gotta have an original angle that isn't already being covered too. Good luck!

    Guild leader for Goats of Thunder. No pants allowed.

  • Tzarakiel.7490Tzarakiel.7490 Member ✭✭✭

    If it's not a display of skill, a guide or discussion, then I only watch videos/streams of games I don't play.

    PvP? What's that? Never heard of it.

  • Donari.5237Donari.5237 Member ✭✭✭✭

    The only videos I regularly pay any heed to are Dulfy's demonstrations of finding complicated spots or JPs, or her demonstrations of new skins of various sorts. When she hasn't done a skins video I look at other content creators' work and find it dwells over long on irrelevant material or far too many camera circles that leave me motion sick, or wants to natter on about personal opinions of the appearances.

    Any other videos tend to keep the camera too close to the character and randomly move the pov so I am nauseated in seconds. Even Wooden Potatoes I have to only listen too since his screen material seldom has anything to do with what he's discussing and is a lot of movement.

    So if you're looking to create useful, watched content, take a look at how Dulfy does it. No longer than it needs to be to show routes and looks, steady camera work, no voiceover. If the information could be conveyed with text and pictures, I would rather see that than have to devote all my attention for twenty minutes to learn something I could have read in three paragraphs in under a minute.

  • borgs.6103borgs.6103 Member ✭✭✭

    Dulfy's MIA for more than a month now. If you want to fill the void Dulfy left, now's your chance! Though I must say it's gonna be a pretty big void to fill.

    Hi.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I wonder if it would help if GW2 artificially inflated viewer numbers on Twitch by doing give-aways like Elder Scrolls Online and some other games do. It doesn't increase numbers of actual viewers - people are very open on that game's forum that all they do is log into the site, select a channel and then minimise the tab, or log in on a phone or tablet and then turn the screen off. But the website still counts it as if they're watching, and since the numbers automatically recorded seem to be the important thing it might help. But I'm not sure if that's actually any good for the people making the videos.

    "Hard knocks, bad luck, been knocked down,
    You got back up, rise up, shine on, keep on fighting, the war is almost done...But then I hear you're gone.
    I feel, when the lights go down, you are still here, all you hold dear remains.
    Your star never fades."

  • MetalGirl.2370MetalGirl.2370 Member ✭✭✭

    MMOs are usually boring to watch.

    STOP TELLING ME I'M NOT FORCED TO DO SOMETHING - I AM AN AP HUNTER SO YES, I HAVE TO DO IT
    ....AND GIVE HAIRSTYLES !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Jack Redline.5379Jack Redline.5379 Member ✭✭✭✭

    a guy here a while ago posted a short story made up about his thief as if it was his friend and as the Balance patches came his thief became more and more weak he attatched it to the sickness.
    I rly loved it and was actualy for a short period of time trying to do something similiar = write something on this kind of note
    Like : The last Daredevil
    or something like that you know but then i simply stopped caring since i have already invested my time into writing and let me tell you it is not proffitable nor worth it
    BUT if some YT content creator was to make it like lets say
    Series of a short clips 5 min long each could together be a story
    I would definitelly go for it and try to write down something
    If you want a picture of what i mean. Check Red vs Blue on the YT
    That is the stuff I can imagine ppl would like done from GW2 and tbh game offers enough assets for it. sort of. I could imagine it being done from 3rd person perspective somehow. I Am not putting much thought in it rn. But if you are interested we can talk.

    Also the majority of the conent this game produces is just gameplay
    Which can carry you only that far = until all players already know how to play the game and new players simply learn it from ppl in game
    ''How I play the game'' type of videos are lame at best and that is why they dont get watches.
    You want to make content? Make content that has purpose or a story that sort of makes watchers inclined to check it out
    To watch how a mesmer wrecks 5 man squad in PvP got boring at 2017

  • Chichimec.9364Chichimec.9364 Member ✭✭✭

    All I can offer the op is what I like or don't like with a bit of why. Generally I look for GW2 videos on youtube when I'm stuck someplace and need a guide, am looking for build ideas, or am wanting to see what a new skin looks like. A straight forward, focused, and concise offering of information works best for me. I don't watch other people playing a game because that seems boring to me. If a person is frenetically trying to be funny and/or has a grating voice, I turn off the video. Same thing with long, meandering monologues or with extended ranting.

    There are three GW2 content creators who stick out to me. The primary one is of course Dulfy. She's my first go to whenever I need a guide. Hopefully she's okay and will return at some point. The second is The Herald. Her profession videos really helped me in my early days here and I enjoy her fashion war videos. Plus, she also has an almost hypnotic voice that I love listening to. The third is Cellofrag. I actually joined Patreon just to send him a little support every month. His gold farming and elementalist videos have been particularly helpful to me. I love his cello music and he also does incredible giveaways on a regular basis.

    All this of course is only one person's opinions and I'm not sure it helps identify any open niches but it's the best response I can give the op about what kind of content creators I prefer.

  • Nury.3062Nury.3062 Member ✭✭✭

    The guildwars 2 community is filled with people who have jobs,kids or have gw2 as their secondary game,the casual nature of the game caters to these type of people,i am in some of the casual categories and i even come from a hardcore mmo background,pvp-er,guild leader etc. but i am past my mmo gaming prime and that's why i play GW2,because i can relax and even sometimes do some "hardcore" stuff but there is no way i waste my time with content created by youtubers or watch twitch...i have better things to do and let's be honest,there isn't much quality in the gw2 stuff on youtube or twitch.

  • I'm probably not the target audience for 'content creators' so I'm not sure how useful my opinion is, but here goes... I only watch game videos that have a clear purpose, focus, or concept, and that pretty much exclusively contain active gameplay footage. If a video focusses on the creator rather than the content, there's no chance of me being interested.

    For GW2 there are pretty much only two types of video I'm likely to watch: achievement/jumping puzzle guides (which I only watch if I'm really stuck) and build guides. In both cases, I want the video to be no longer than it needs to be, with only genuinely helpful (and subtitled) commentary if there is any. If I see anything that isn't active gameplay footage, or where someone is fighting a training golem, I'll skip it - and if the video is mostly like that, I'll find another one.

    I have tried to watch other types of GW2 video, but I didn't really find them interesting. A while ago I tried to get into Wooden Potatoes, but I find that he takes 45 minutes to say something he could have said more effectively in 5 minutes, and visuals are often unrelated or only tangentially related to the rambly commentary. I've also tried a few times to get into watching the competitive modes, but I think, for me at least, this game just isn't made for spectators. It's not just the visual noise, lack of player character collision, and the fact that you need an in-depth knowledge of all the skills to know what's going on - it's also that PvP and WvW don't have very well-defined objectives, so there's no real sense of progression towards a goal. I think this would apply to gameplay montages as well (for any game) - there's a danger that they'll only show you what the gameplay looks like, but take away any sense of purpose behind it.

    I did watch the whole of the Living World Season 1 film once, and I thought that was very good (though a little heavy-handed with the exposition). I was going to say "if it was still available to play, I wouldn't have watched the film", but I'm not sure that's true - I actually did play some of it at the time, but I found some of it boring and other parts didn't work properly for me (massive lag in group events), so I actually gave up on GW2 and played GW1 instead...

    @Fatherbliss.4701 said:
    I've done research for my own business purposes on this topic and generally content comes down to a few key varieties:
    1. Humorous
    2. Highly competitive best in class play
    3. Instructional - guides, walk through videos. Showing people how to complete some task
    4. Entertaining - Huge category with a number of variables

    I'd add to that 5. Reviews. That said, reviews of GW2 seem a bit redundant to me because of the free-to-play version. I guess reviews of HoT and PoF could be helpful, but there are probably plenty already. My experience is that amateur reviews are often not actually that helpful, since they're likely to focus too heavily on one particular feature and/or miss the point of certain elements of the game design.

  • As a viewer I prefer to watch humorous videos. Noxxi, the Noxxian creates great short meme clips that always make me giggle. Silverdisc has a few videos where he and his guild tries to Raid, which doesn't work out very well but they have a great time and laugh together and it's hilarious to watch.
    Sometimes I watch gameplay but only if it's like first impressions of certain story elements (eg reactions to when Aurene died etc). If needed I always seek out guides for JP's and similar tasks.
    What I notice lack is videos telling a story, where the creators craft something unique for their characters. Or something simple like appreciation videos for mounts. (These I've seen a bunch, especially for the Griffon mount and I enjoyed a lot of them)

    Myself as a content creator, I make stuff from the last category I mentioned above. I enjoy the most to tell a story no one else has seen, make my viewers feel emotions that'll leave a mark when the video is over.

  • Tiviana.2650Tiviana.2650 Member ✭✭✭

    Spoof videos for entertainment is about all i can think of. WoW has a big following for creators that make funny spoof videos, music vids, and fan created story vids, i have only seen a few for gw2. But i would go the entertainment route if it was me, one thing also that helps is casting players from the game. With wow a lot of the big content creators will post that they are looking for players to have parts in a video as their characters i mean. Its always good to get fans involved.

  • Content creators of the past where mostly pasionate players making creative videos of the game(s) they love. Most of the current content creators of now are just payed influencers, a cheap marketing tool. As someone already playing games for many years before the millenium, its quite disheartening to see the creative hobby creators with passion for the game(s) beeing replaced by marketing instruments claiming to be something they are not.

  • Psycoprophet.8107Psycoprophet.8107 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I miss lord wafflez comedic vids,he was amusing to watch

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