GW2 D&D Questions and Advice — Guild Wars 2 Forums

GW2 D&D Questions and Advice

Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

Hey guys! I'm posting this in the general because I wasn't sure where else to do so, and it made the most sense besides the Lore section.

I am going to be running a D&D 5e game set in GW2! Only 3 of 6 players have played GW2 and one of them have finished any of the story lines. Personal I have finished GW2 main story and HoT.

Starting in 1325 AE. It is going to start off in Caledon Forest following the Shield of the Moon quest line. I am not sure where I want to go after this for Chapter 2. Depending on how things go, they could continue with Sylvari story lines, but either Asuran or Human works as well. For Asuran, I was thinking VAL-A Golem. Human, either the Fall of Falcon Company or the Floating Grizwhirl. Sylvari would be Act with Wisdom.

The Sylvari, Act with Wisdom would make the most sense I think, to point characters to eventually taking on Zhaitan and the final Chapter. But I don't know if I should keep them on the Sylvari story lines, if that would be fair?

Granted I don't have all my players yet, but so far I have a Kodan Ranger, Skrit Necromancer, Char Elementalist, and Sylvari Thief. Two more players are expected and only the Kodan and Char have been officially made. The only other thing is I am not sure to use experience or milestones for leveling up?

Does anyone have any suggestions, advice, comments, etc? It would be greatly appreciated. Game doesn't start for a few weeks and I've been spending a lot of time researching the stories, and areas, especially to make travel more realistic. (AkA. Traveling on foot from Lions Arch to the Black Citadel is 8 weeks march, 6 in good weather. As per The Sea of Sorrows GW2 novel).

Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

Comments

  • Randulf.7614Randulf.7614 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I’m not sure you can get away with Kodan or skritt (esp a single skritt), but I’ll be interested in hearing how it plays out

    What sleep is here? What dreams there are in the unctuous coiling of the snakes mortal shuffling. weapon in my hand. My hand the arcing deathblow at the end of all things. The horror. The horror. I embrace it. . .

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Randulf.7614 said:
    I’m not sure you can get away with Kodan or skritt (esp a single skritt), but I’ll be interested in hearing how it plays out

    Skritt with a class I think may be a bit out of Lore. However, admittedly (and he is well aware) the player isn't the brightest and likes to play characters taking that into account. He likes playing characters he can just have fun with. The necromancer class we found is the closest one to having a warlock type feel. So we are hoping it will work out.

    Admittedly as well, the Kodan took a back ground where he is the last of his Tribe, meaning his Sanctuary is gone. Having renamed himself Comingstorm (or something to similar effect) he plans on working himself stronger while trying to balance his new found loss and anger with the teachings he was brought up with.

    It is going to be very interesting, or so I am hoping! I will for sure let you know how it ends up going! (And depending on what kind of interest people have, I may do some regular updates on the game here.)

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • draxynnic.3719draxynnic.3719 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Broadly speaking, there's probably a degree to which the best thing to do as a GM is probably to have all of the plotlines happening (and maybe some of your own devising), and to let the players decide which they want to follow. Naturally, though, there are probably some plotlines that they're more likely to hear about than others.

    Is there a background to why the Kodan and Charr are so far from home?

    For the skritt being functional on his own... you might have an in-built explanation based on the skritt being a necromancer: you could come up with a theme by which the skritt is the only living survivor of something necromantic, and is now haunted by the ghosts of the dead skritt. The skritt PC might be the only one who can see and interact with them, but they can provide enough of the skritt communal thinking for the skritt to be a functional Necromancer, while also providing the player with a roleplaying hook.

  • Konig Des Todes.2086Konig Des Todes.2086 Member ✭✭✭✭

    My opinion about running campaigns in a pre-established story is basically treat all plots going on in that story as ongoing, but start in a location that fits the backgrounds of all the involved player characters, and then build up a local threat with seeds of the pre-established story being talked about. Your players will decide whether to follow those threads or not, so it'd be good to have a rough idea of a general antagonist you can seed in. Basically treating the players as random adventures and the adventure itself as a "what if" - either they will, or they won't, involve themselves in the original story or your own. But whether they're involved or not, those stories still happen in the distance and may come to bite the players' in the kitten.

    But if you're the type who just likes to use a setting and forego the official plot direction, then you could establish a champion of Zhaitan that would show up and hinder them regardless of their starting place.

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    @Randulf.7614 said:
    I’m not sure you can get away with Kodan or skritt (esp a single skritt), but I’ll be interested in hearing how it plays out

    Skritt with a class I think may be a bit out of Lore. However, admittedly (and he is well aware) the player isn't the brightest and likes to play characters taking that into account. He likes playing characters he can just have fun with. The necromancer class we found is the closest one to having a warlock type feel. So we are hoping it will work out.

    Admittedly as well, the Kodan took a back ground where he is the last of his Tribe, meaning his Sanctuary is gone. Having renamed himself Comingstorm (or something to similar effect) he plans on working himself stronger while trying to balance his new found loss and anger with the teachings he was brought up with.

    It is going to be very interesting, or so I am hoping! I will for sure let you know how it ends up going! (And depending on what kind of interest people have, I may do some regular updates on the game here.)

    Kodan are seen in Lion's Arch, so it wouldn't be surprising if one or two decided to go further out, for various reasons. One could be searching out powerful allies to fight off Jormag, or seeking to understand the Elder Dragon balance, or simply to spread the word of Koda. Maybe they're a self-imposed exile who lost his faith because of some loss (iirc, there's a kodan like that in Snowden Drifts? May be misremembering though.).

    As for skritt, while they're typically "not smart" solo, they're not (fully, there's naturally some variance) incompetent. Their "smart when in a group" basically comes from the ability to quickly talk to other skritt to discuss things out, so they'd be slower in understanding, but not necessarily stupid or incompetent. Since the skritt's a necromancer, they could instead commune with skritt spirits for that discussing things out to understand; or since long-distance communicators are a thing in the game (short distance in PS's time though), that's an equal viability. Though I'd just go with the "slower to understand certain situations but not stupid" getup myself.

    Could also work in a follower system for the skritt (to increase intelligence) and charr (warband).

    Ah, all this reminds me of how long it's been since I've played in a campaign. :I

    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @draxynnic.3719 said:
    Is there a background to why the Kodan and Charr are so far from home?

    For the skritt being functional on his own... you might have an in-built explanation based on the skritt being a necromancer: you could come up with a theme by which the skritt is the only living survivor of something necromantic, and is now haunted by the ghosts of the dead skritt. The skritt PC might be the only one who can see and interact with them, but they can provide enough of the skritt communal thinking for the skritt to be a functional Necromancer, while also providing the player with a roleplaying hook.

    So the hook for having everyone (excluding any Sylvari players) being so far from home is they all got a letter from the '-Your Herald' that sends you the first letter about Destiny's Edge. Bringing them to this place to get started. I'm making him a slightly bigger deal, going with the idea he has seen a potential path for these guys to take down Zhaitan. For it to succeed they have to start here.

    'Greetings,
    We have not met, but I have long been a follower of your exploits. I am a collector of tales of great daring and heroism, and your name has come up increasingly in the stories that have been reported to me. It was suggested to me to both contact you to add your stories to my collection, and to use the whispers and rumors of stories to help all of Tyria. Especially in this time of troubles caused by the awakenings of the Elder Dragons.
    To put this theory to the test and to garner you more stories, I am putting together a small group to which you are invited to join. Meet in the Grove, beneath the roots of the Pale Tree. In the tavern of Lantern & Wyvern on the 47th day in the Season of the Zephyr. This token will allow one use of the Asuran Portal Network from your Capital to the Grove. Use it, should you accept.
    -Your Herald'

    So that is my opening plot hook, and then while they head out, I was thinking a Sylvari Pod will be opening when they reach the Village of Astorea. That will be the Sylvari PS character who dreamed of fighting Zhaitan. I plan on the group not traveling with him, but running into him from time to time as they cross major Chapter/Story points.

    @Konig Des Todes.2086 said:
    My opinion about running campaigns in a pre-established story is basically treat all plots going on in that story as ongoing, but start in a location that fits the backgrounds of all the involved player characters, and then build up a local threat with seeds of the pre-established story being talked about. Your players will decide whether to follow those threads or not, so it'd be good to have a rough idea of a general antagonist you can seed in. Basically treating the players as random adventures and the adventure itself as a "what if" - either they will, or they won't, involve themselves in the original story or your own. But whether they're involved or not, those stories still happen in the distance and may come to bite the players' in the kitten.
    But if you're the type who just likes to use a setting and forego the official plot direction, then you could establish a champion of Zhaitan that would show up and hinder them regardless of their starting place.

    I am liking the having all plots going at the same time idea. Would you wager most of them follow something of the same time table?

    As for the Skritt, I like both of your ideas. Both the tragic loss and its the skritt spirits that are helping him channel his necromantic abilities as well as the slow to understand aspect, but the speed of speech helping move things along. (Which would explain why the Asura are having such a difficult time with Skritt, as Asura tend to slow their speech when speaking to someone they deem less intelligent.)

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    Oh and per GW2 lore, the Asuran Gate Network (AGN), is a thing linking all capital cities. However the waypoints are not.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Lexi.1398Lexi.1398 Member ✭✭✭

    As for experience versus milestones, im in general a much bigger supporter of milestones. UNLESS.... you're giving the same exp payout to eveyrone in the party regaurdless of partipicipation/and give equivalent exp for split group scenarios, in which case using milestones removes you any need to keep track of numbers. As a player and DM, first of all i hate it in any situation when i have to compete for exp, and i like milestones specifically because it's easier to tailor level ups around the groups experience with d&d/a given class + around the fun. Giving set exp payouts kinda places a mandatory progression on things, and even if you adjust exp numbers as you go i think that's a kinda annoying step that you could avoid. if i was leading a group of 5 people who never played d&d before it's unlikely i'd level anyone over 2 for a few sessions depending on how they adjust, similarly if i know most of the group is comfy i can just bring levels on faster so people can get to more complex and fun fights sooner.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Lexi.1398 said:
    As for experience versus milestones, im in general a much bigger supporter of milestones. UNLESS.... you're giving the same exp payout to eveyrone in the party regaurdless of partipicipation/and give equivalent exp for split group scenarios, in which case using milestones removes you any need to keep track of numbers. As a player and DM, first of all i hate it in any situation when i have to compete for exp, and i like milestones specifically because it's easier to tailor level ups around the groups experience with d&d/a given class + around the fun. Giving set exp payouts kinda places a mandatory progression on things, and even if you adjust exp numbers as you go i think that's a kinda annoying step that you could avoid. if i was leading a group of 5 people who never played d&d before it's unlikely i'd level anyone over 2 for a few sessions depending on how they adjust, similarly if i know most of the group is comfy i can just bring levels on faster so people can get to more complex and fun fights sooner.

    The milestones would makes sense in that regard. I will admit most of my experience is with D&D 3.5, which was solely exp based. However they did have a mechanic that granted additional exp based on your class along with the typical Exp for defeating a monster, finishing a quest, etc. For example, a Fighter would get 50 exp for each time the killed a new Monster for the first time. A Cleric, 50 exp for spreading their Gods mythos. Rogue, exp based on the CR treasure they managed to steal successfully. Etc. It did make a few gaps, occasionally, but nothing that caused problems. The down side is I'm not sure how I would translate that for some of the GW2 classes.

    Milestones would work well, but I would have to make sure I don't under or over level them. Which is honestly just a personal concern, and one I'm sure a few GMs have to deal with. I think I may stick with the Milestones, at least for the first few levels and see how it goes. Thank you for your input!

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Konig Des Todes.2086Konig Des Todes.2086 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Kashin.7192 said:
    So the hook for having everyone (excluding any Sylvari players) being so far from home is they all got a letter from the '-Your Herald' that sends you the first letter about Destiny's Edge. Bringing them to this place to get started. I'm making him a slightly bigger deal, going with the idea he has seen a potential path for these guys to take down Zhaitan. For it to succeed they have to start here.

    Might be better using E. Your Herald is just a fangirl scholar that's writing a thesis and is using the up-and-coming hero that was mentored by a member of DE to get details. As such, the Herald (aka Camilla) wouldn't be paying attention to the PC if not for the fact they were mentored by a member of DE.

    As disappointing as that revelations was.

    E, on the other hand, is a political spymaster who'd no doubt want to know of any infamous individual. Or you can create your own mysterious figure.

    I am liking the having all plots going at the same time idea. Would you wager most of them follow something of the same time table?

    More or less, yes. What we have implies that the entirety of the personal story took more or less a year to complete from start to end. The Great Hunt was a winter festival but every other storyline begins early spring, and Zhaitan's killed early 1326 (just "days" before 60 Zephyr 1326).

    Based on this, it can be surmised that the chapter 2 plots occur before 75 Zephyr 1325, thus early spring, as the letter seems referring to Caudecus (who had more interest in war with Kryta than worshiping Lazarus) and the prior confessor died in chapter 2. Especially since later, the confessor is called a male.

    So starting on 47 Zephyr would put you at the very beginning of such plots, most likely.

    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Konig Des Todes.2086 said:
    Might be better using E. Your Herald is just a fangirl scholar that's writing a thesis and is using the up-and-coming hero that was mentored by a member of DE to get details. As such, the Herald (aka Camilla) wouldn't be paying attention to the PC if not for the fact they were mentored by a member of DE.

    That is disappointing. I guess I never spoke to her, or if I did, I blocked it out.

    E, on the other hand, is a political spymaster who'd no doubt want to know of any infamous individual. Or you can create your own mysterious figure.

    I think I will go with the more mysterious figure. A mix of mysticism and conspiracy connect the dot style. I'll turn that disappointing reveal right around with a new character!... Drawing on the 'Herald mystique'.

    Based on this, it can be surmised that the chapter 2 plots occur before 75 Zephyr 1325, thus early spring, as the letter seems referring to Caudecus (who had more interest in war with Kryta than worshiping Lazarus) and the prior confessor died in chapter 2. Especially since later, the confessor is called a male.

    So starting on 47 Zephyr would put you at the very beginning of such plots, most likely.

    Perfect. Thank you for that information. The only 'official' timeline I have managed to find so far was yearly. So this helps greatly!

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Kalavier.1097Kalavier.1097 Member ✭✭✭

    @Kashin.7192 said:
    Oh and per GW2 lore, the Asuran Gate Network (AGN), is a thing linking all capital cities. However the waypoints are not.

    The waypoints are a thing in lore. It's just that most people don't use them because of costs (similar to the Asura gates which tend to cost, and cost even more if trying to move large amounts of goods), and apparently can't easily move cargo thus making overland travel or sea based shipping more feasible for almost everybody.

    About Skritt, as somebody said, the Skritt don't get dumb when alone, it's just they are easily distracted and take a little longer to think things through. When in groups they communicate using a method other races can't hear very rapidly, allowing them to sort ideas quickly and stay focused. We've seen singular skritt used as messengers and assistants, even in Orr.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Kalavier.1097 said:
    The waypoints are a thing in lore. It's just that most people don't use them because of costs (similar to the Asura gates which tend to cost, and cost even more if trying to move large amounts of goods), and apparently can't easily move cargo thus making overland travel or sea based shipping more feasible for almost everybody.

    When it comes to money, I've never liked the conversion of cost for things with D&D. Everything I read a gold coin is typically something the common person would earn for about a year of hard work. Now that might be a bit much for a D&D game, but I was thinking of awarding money roughly along the cost of what GW2 prices it and gives it out for. First play through it took ages to earn a full Gold coin. Granted their conversion is 100 cp = 1 sp and 100 sp = 1 gp. So when it comes to prices i may stick with that. Which makes the waypoint cost make more sense. With D&D income, well they wouldn't have any reason to use anything else to travel since it would cost pretty much nothing.

    So, I think I can keep waypoints, at least those that are to smaller settlements and way house type areas. Just convert the money system to something closer to GW2. Thanks for the heads up.

    About Skritt, as somebody said, the Skritt don't get dumb when alone, it's just they are easily distracted and take a little longer to think things through. When in groups they communicate using a method other races can't hear very rapidly, allowing them to sort ideas quickly and stay focused. We've seen singular skritt used as messengers and assistants, even in Orr.

    I may have over looked this stuff about skritt during my play through. I mainly played Asura and from what I do recall, it was lack of intelligence over understanding. So it's good to know about the communication and focus. Thank you!

    (And incase anyone hadn't noticed yet, yeah I've been using some of my responses to you guys as a block of text working out my thought process on the matter with the new info. xD )

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Konig Des Todes.2086Konig Des Todes.2086 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    @Kalavier.1097 said:
    The waypoints are a thing in lore. It's just that most people don't use them because of costs (similar to the Asura gates which tend to cost, and cost even more if trying to move large amounts of goods), and apparently can't easily move cargo thus making overland travel or sea based shipping more feasible for almost everybody.

    When it comes to money, I've never liked the conversion of cost for things with D&D. Everything I read a gold coin is typically something the common person would earn for about a year of hard work. Now that might be a bit much for a D&D game, but I was thinking of awarding money roughly along the cost of what GW2 prices it and gives it out for. First play through it took ages to earn a full Gold coin. Granted their conversion is 100 cp = 1 sp and 100 sp = 1 gp. So when it comes to prices i may stick with that. Which makes the waypoint cost make more sense. With D&D income, well they wouldn't have any reason to use anything else to travel since it would cost pretty much nothing.

    It should be noted that lorewise, you must walk up to and interact with the waypoint.

    Personal headcanon, but I like to think that these beacons under certain waypoints in Orr is a part of all waypoints, given post-release lore on waypoints.

    They're also unstable, with them having to be replaced or moved every so often. They also do not exist in locations not yet explored by asura-funded groups (such as the Orders, Pact, or Peacekeepers). Lastly, a lot of waypoints seen mechanically likely do not exist in lore, otherwise certain storylines, such as the nobles in Verdant Brink, would otherwise make little to no sense. I treat all waypoints outside normal Central Tyria areas to be much like we see in Dragonfall - the waypoints were brought into the area by the Pact, Lionguard, etc.

    So if you want, you can bring up a map of waypoints and knock off half and say "these exist, the rest do not". And if you want to force your party to take the long way instead of waypoints, you can have them malfunctioning due to aforementioned link's mentioned erosion.

    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.

  • InsaneQR.7412InsaneQR.7412 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I actually wanna build my own gw2 tabletop rule book, so basically a full on pen and paper of gw2 and not just a campaign.
    Personally, I would deviate from the main story and explore new territories to actually make better use out of the freedom that is to your disposal. Like exploring Goemms lab in province metrica or visiting the wizards castle and revealing his plots etc.

  • Turkeyspit.3965Turkeyspit.3965 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Randulf.7614 said:
    I’m not sure you can get away with Kodan or skritt (esp a single skritt), but I’ll be interested in hearing how it plays out

    Well generally speaking in RPGs, the PCs are 'heroes', somewhat exceptional compared to the rest of the population. Not all RPGs subscribe to this notion, and not even sure if 5e D&D does, but I remember 1st and 2e certainly did.

    So in this instance, a PC Skritt might be a genius, and therefore have average intelligence when apart from other skritt :wink:

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:
    I actually wanna build my own gw2 tabletop rule book, so basically a full on pen and paper of gw2 and not just a campaign.
    Personally, I would deviate from the main story and explore new territories to actually make better use out of the freedom that is to your disposal. Like exploring Goemms lab in province metrica or visiting the wizard's castle and revealing his plots etc.

    I actually do plan on expanding the little things like that. One of my biggest concerns was travel.. Obviously, travel is condensed in the game so people don't get bored running from place to place. For example in Caledon Forest, running from the Village Astorea to Brigid's Overlook on the North-East edge of Sandycove Beach in the game takes maybe a minute to run to if you don't stop to fight. I've worked it out to be about 2 days travel for my game and am going to use that distance as the basis for a lot of my travel times.

    Now say the party was traveling through Metrica Province and they come across Goemm's Lab or Oola's Lab. They can explore, find the notes, etc. Basically, make a dungeon out of it. Something they can explore and learn about the world with. The world is full of potential plot. I am going to need to find things to fill up that empty space and give them a little adventure. And who knows, they may not sink into the main plot at all. They might even go for Elona well before they're meant to, should they figure out a way to do so, for example. Make their way across the Blazeridge Mountains, orr should they come across Zphyerites, get passage to Cantha, etc. It would lead to improvisation as I cannot find much information about those areas in general. Which should be fun!

    @Turkeyspit.3965 said:
    Well generally speaking in RPGs, the PCs are 'heroes', somewhat exceptional compared to the rest of the population. Not all RPGs subscribe to this notion, and not even sure if 5e D&D does, but I remember 1st and 2e certainly did.
    So in this instance, a PC Skritt might be a genius, and therefore have average intelligence when apart from other skritt :wink:

    I hadn't thought of it that way either! You are quite right that 5e doesn't make the players Heroes as much as 2nd ed, etc.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:
    I actually wanna build my own gw2 tabletop rule book, so basically a full on pen and paper of gw2 and not just a campaign.

    I would love to see that! I've found a lot of Homebrew conversions of races and a few classes for GW2 into 5e. But to see its own gamebook would be amazing. I would love to see what mechanics and such you come up with. If it is a project you want to work on, let me know. I would love to help.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • @Kashin.7192 said:

    When it comes to money, I've never liked the conversion of cost for things with D&D. Everything I read a gold coin is typically something the common person would earn for about a year of hard work. Now that might be a bit much for a D&D game, but I was thinking of awarding money roughly along the cost of what GW2 prices it and gives it out for. First play through it took ages to earn a full Gold coin. Granted their conversion is 100 cp = 1 sp and 100 sp = 1 gp. So when it comes to prices i may stick with that. Which makes the waypoint cost make more sense. With D&D income, well they wouldn't have any reason to use anything else to travel since it would cost pretty much nothing.

    I am just relearning D&D myself, and was winging it as I prepped an adventure...players would find 50 sp in the captain's sea chest, 5gp in a random treasure bag, etc. Then I started rolling off the treasure tables, and found that the players would get 300 gp and 55pp for killing 5 rats. :o Had to rethink the whole economy. If your players are used to the regular D&D loot levels, you may need to leave the GW2 economy behind, because they will be used to getting hundreds and thousands in gold.

  • InsaneQR.7412InsaneQR.7412 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:
    I actually wanna build my own gw2 tabletop rule book, so basically a full on pen and paper of gw2 and not just a campaign.

    I would love to see that! I've found a lot of Homebrew conversions of races and a few classes for GW2 into 5e. But to see its own gamebook would be amazing. I would love to see what mechanics and such you come up with. If it is a project you want to work on, let me know. I would love to help.

    Due to my lack of experience I don't wanna stray to far off from 5e. So I wanna keep the leveling mechanics more or less.
    Just instead of learning feats you can choose a specialization line from your class which has traits in it you have to choose from etc.

    The numbers stay more or less the same and the level cap is also 20. Although you can elite specialize at max level (this replaces the capstone basically).

    Atm it's rather conceptual and I rephrase the player introduction on pathfinder to get more or less into it.

    I have to order the PHB and the DM guide though to really get a grasp out of it.

    Basically what I wanna do is to really get the game on paper. So there will be conditions, boons, durations over multiple turns, CC, stunbreaks (which may or may not succeed).

    I want to remove the current spell system though because it is not really fitting into gw2 lore where magic is basically everywhere.
    Thus I enhance on the cantrip system and try to bake in a cool down system that can be altered by alacrity etc.

    Its gonna take a while for sure.
    I may come back to your offer, but atm I have to study for my degree so there isn't much you will here from me in the near future.

  • InsaneQR.7412InsaneQR.7412 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 5, 2019

    @Cragga the Eighty Third.6015 said:

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    When it comes to money, I've never liked the conversion of cost for things with D&D. Everything I read a gold coin is typically something the common person would earn for about a year of hard work. Now that might be a bit much for a D&D game, but I was thinking of awarding money roughly along the cost of what GW2 prices it and gives it out for. First play through it took ages to earn a full Gold coin. Granted their conversion is 100 cp = 1 sp and 100 sp = 1 gp. So when it comes to prices i may stick with that. Which makes the waypoint cost make more sense. With D&D income, well they wouldn't have any reason to use anything else to travel since it would cost pretty much nothing.

    I am just relearning D&D myself, and was winging it as I prepped an adventure...players would find 50 sp in the captain's sea chest, 5gp in a random treasure bag, etc. Then I started rolling off the treasure tables, and found that the players would get 300 gp and 55pp for killing 5 rats. :o Had to rethink the whole economy. If your players are used to the regular D&D loot levels, you may need to leave the GW2 economy behind, because they will be used to getting hundreds and thousands in gold.

    We play gw2 often but we just start to get into DnD.
    The reaction would be probably quite the opposite than yours^^
    But I agree the gw2 economy makes more sense.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:

    @Cragga the Eighty Third.6015 said:

    I am just relearning D&D myself, and was winging it as I prepped an adventure...players would find 50 sp in the captain's sea chest, 5gp in a random treasure bag, etc. Then I started rolling off the treasure tables, and found that the players would get 300 gp and 55pp for killing 5 rats. :o Had to rethink the whole economy. If your players are used to the regular D&D loot levels, you may need to leave the GW2 economy behind, because they will be used to getting hundreds and thousands in gold.

    We play gw2 often but we just start to get into DnD.
    The reaction would be probably quite the opposite than yours^^
    But I agree the gw2 economy makes more sense.

    To catch what both of you are saying. I only have one player who is a 'meta gamer' type, and he probably will have the most issue getting use to GW2 currency system. However most of the players are new to 5e, so the biggest thing would be just to not have them automatically think book price. I've had some experience with some story telling systems (Star Wars: Force and Destiny and Legend of the Five Rings) where things could be manipulated slightly or suggested by the players. So I may have some assistance from them for such things.

    Very Rough Example (VRE):

    GM: You are in the Town of Cathal, its a simple village, just past being a hamlet. There are a few shops. One of them sells plant worked material, the equivalent of a leather worked shop from a human city. You can go there to replace your backpack that had been torn apart by a drake earlier in the adventure. As we are getting used to the new currency system. What do you think a fair price would be?
    PC: I would say about 32 cp? (ie price in game from merchants)
    GM: 32 cp it is.
    ///
    GM: You are now in Divinity's Reach. The Human Capital of Kryta. It is a city of magnificents and splendor. You spy a high end story. It seems they specialize in worked leather accessories. Your backpack is rather worn and tattered since you picked it up all the back in Cathal. One of the straps even rotted through after that Nightmare Court attack. This would be a great place to pick up a new one, however it is much more upscale then Cathal. How about 1 sp and 60 cp?
    PC: A 6x mark up is a bit high. Even for such a city. Granted it is a high end store, so how about a 4x mark up? 3x for being a full blown city, and another for being a high end store? So 1 sp and 28 cp?

    I'm fine with a bit back and forth like that to help work out the currency, but still along the lines of GW2 currency.

    What do you guys think!

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:
    I may come back to your offer, but atm I have to study for my degree so there isn't much you will here from me in the near future.

    Good luck with you degree! You can do it!

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • InsaneQR.7412InsaneQR.7412 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:
    I may come back to your offer, but atm I have to study for my degree so there isn't much you will here from me in the near future.

    Good luck with you degree! You can do it!

    No backing out after 3.5 years ;)
    But thx dude^^

  • Narcemus.1348Narcemus.1348 Member ✭✭✭
    edited July 5, 2019

    I've honestly been personally going through and creating my own PHB for a Guild Wars D&D. My personal campaign that I have been playing with friends is about 40 years after Guild Wars 1. We had just been using base D&D, but decided I wanted to make a real Guild Wars feel. So far I have created a spreadsheet of equipment for the original Guild Wars currency, I have re-listed the D&D spells into the Guild Wars schools of magic, I created racial sheets for Asura, Norn, Tengu, Charr, Human, and Dwarves, including sub races for asuran colleges, spirits of the wild, charr legions, stone dwarves vs deldrimor, etc... I am in the process of starting professions. I am mostly using D&D rules for magic (though everyone uses a focus for magic rather than components).

    If this started taking off I might go crazy with more stuff, but if it was just me and my group of friends, D&D rules would suffice. Eventually I would hope to make a monster manual as well creating many different monsters from Guild Wars and Guild Wars 2 and I would hope to create an option to easily adjust a monster's difficulty based on the circumstance (hatchling/recruit, veteran, champion, legendary, etc...)

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Narcemus.1348 said:
    I've honestly been personally going through and creating my own PHB for a Guild Wars D&D. My personal campaign that I have been playing with friends is about 40 years after Guild Wars 1. We had just been using base D&D, but decided I wanted to make a real Guild Wars feel. So far I have created a spreadsheet of equipment for the original Guild Wars currency, I have re-listed the D&D spells into the Guild Wars schools of magic, I created racial sheets for Asura, Norn, Tengu, Charr, Human, and Dwarves, including sub races for asuran colleges, spirits of the wild, charr legions, stone dwarves vs deldrimor, etc... I am in the process of starting professions. I am mostly using D&D rules for magic (though everyone uses a focus for magic rather than components).

    If this started taking off I might go crazy with more stuff, but if it was just me and my group of friends, D&D rules would suffice. Eventually I would hope to make a monster manual as well creating many different monsters from Guild Wars and Guild Wars 2 and I would hope to create an option to easily adjust a monster's difficulty based on the circumstance (hatchling/recruit, veteran, champion, legendary, etc...)

    Now this does sound awesome. Like I said, I've only really been using 5e with homebrews of races and classes. Arcane Focus is going to replace components. Oh, and it has been verified via Sea of Sorrows novel (not sure if other sources have confirmed or said otherwise) that a weapon has to be used as the focus. Depending on the quality, I think it was, determined how potent it could be used for magic.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Kalavier.1097Kalavier.1097 Member ✭✭✭

    @Konig Des Todes.2086 said:
    It should be noted that lorewise, you must walk up to and interact with the waypoint.

    Personal headcanon, but I like to think that these beacons under certain waypoints in Orr is a part of all waypoints, given post-release lore on waypoints.

    They're also unstable, with them having to be replaced or moved every so often. They also do not exist in locations not yet explored by asura-funded groups (such as the Orders, Pact, or Peacekeepers). Lastly, a lot of waypoints seen mechanically likely do not exist in lore, otherwise certain storylines, such as the nobles in Verdant Brink, would otherwise make little to no sense. I treat all waypoints outside normal Central Tyria areas to be much like we see in Dragonfall - the waypoints were brought into the area by the Pact, Lionguard, etc.

    So if you want, you can bring up a map of waypoints and knock off half and say "these exist, the rest do not". And if you want to force your party to take the long way instead of waypoints, you can have them malfunctioning due to aforementioned link's mentioned erosion.

    Indeed, every npc we see interacting with a waypoint first had to walk directly under it. I think that post PS waypoints are like you say, brought in externally and setup similar to how they were in Orr (fun fact, in one Orr event in Cursed Shore, you escort a force to take/retake a camp. The moment the area is cleared and the waypoint becomes active again, you see reinforcements appearing though it.) Heart of Thorns areas I'd say were setup later as the regions were somewhat secured.

    Course, waypoints are only good for moving people, as we've never seen them used for cargo or supplies (Or even wounded, TBH. We see wounded evacuated by Heli a lot, but not by waypoints) so you could use waypoints to quickly get there or reinforce, but to bring back treasure/supplies you'll need to hike.

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    @InsaneQR.7412 said:
    I actually wanna build my own gw2 tabletop rule book, so basically a full on pen and paper of gw2 and not just a campaign.
    Personally, I would deviate from the main story and explore new territories to actually make better use out of the freedom that is to your disposal. Like exploring Goemms lab in province metrica or visiting the wizard's castle and revealing his plots etc.

    I actually do plan on expanding the little things like that. One of my biggest concerns was travel.. Obviously, travel is condensed in the game so people don't get bored running from place to place. For example in Caledon Forest, running from the Village Astorea to Brigid's Overlook on the North-East edge of Sandycove Beach in the game takes maybe a minute to run to if you don't stop to fight. I've worked it out to be about 2 days travel for my game and am going to use that distance as the basis for a lot of my travel times.

    Now say the party was traveling through Metrica Province and they come across Goemm's Lab or Oola's Lab. They can explore, find the notes, etc. Basically, make a dungeon out of it. Something they can explore and learn about the world with. The world is full of potential plot. I am going to need to find things to fill up that empty space and give them a little adventure. And who knows, they may not sink into the main plot at all. They might even go for Elona well before they're meant to, should they figure out a way to do so, for example. Make their way across the Blazeridge Mountains, orr should they come across Zphyerites, get passage to Cantha, etc. It would lead to improvisation as I cannot find much information about those areas in general. Which should be fun!

    @Turkeyspit.3965 said:
    Well generally speaking in RPGs, the PCs are 'heroes', somewhat exceptional compared to the rest of the population. Not all RPGs subscribe to this notion, and not even sure if 5e D&D does, but I remember 1st and 2e certainly did.
    So in this instance, a PC Skritt might be a genius, and therefore have average intelligence when apart from other skritt :wink:

    I hadn't thought of it that way either! You are quite right that 5e doesn't make the players Heroes as much as 2nd ed, etc.

    About travel times, there is actually an in universe example. I believe in Ghosts of Ascalon it's stated that the trip from Ebonhawke to AC took three-ish days, at a hard march with little breaks.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Kalavier.1097 said:
    About travel times, there is actually an in universe example. I believe in Ghosts of Ascalon it's stated that the trip from Ebonhawke to AC took three-ish days, at a hard march with little breaks.

    I used the example from Sea of Sorrows. They said travel from Lion's Arch to the Black Citadel is 8 weeks march, 6 in good weather. Granted that was before even Hoelbrak was created, according to the book. So with some work, that is how I got the 2 days travel from Astorea to Brigid's Overlook.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Narcemus.1348Narcemus.1348 Member ✭✭✭

    In the end you just have to pick a model that works for you. When you get down to the nitty gritty it feels like there is some inconsistency for how big the world is. If you compare that 8 weeks from Lion's Arch to Black Citadel with the short 3-5 days travel from Ebonhawke to Ascalon City in Ghosts of Ascalon and the multiple time zones between Divinity's Reach and Lion's Arch also in Ghosts of Ascalon you start to have trouble being exact. I think that the day-grid that I went with ended up was a middle ground between it all. It's about 8 days from Ebonhawke to Ascalon City, and about 2.5 weeks in a straight line from Lion's Arch to Black Citadel. In the end, Rule of Fun is more important than exact detail, and for many groups hand waving long trips is preferable to dragging it out day by day, but it depends on who you are playing with. I know I set out on this journey starting to DM D&D for the first time by playing in a different universe than the game is set, with different mechanics, and I learned a lot in the process. I hope your game is enjoyable!

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    So the person who had been thinking about being a skirtt is changing his mind to be Kodan. Plus another person has joined the group. That gives my party:

    2 Kodan
    2 Charr
    1 Sylvari
    2 Undecided

    Going to lead to some interesting situations.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Narcemus.1348 said:
    In the end you just have to pick a model that works for you. When you get down to the nitty gritty it feels like there is some inconsistency for how big the world is. If you compare that 8 weeks from Lion's Arch to Black Citadel with the short 3-5 days travel from Ebonhawke to Ascalon City in Ghosts of Ascalon and the multiple time zones between Divinity's Reach and Lion's Arch also in Ghosts of Ascalon you start to have trouble being exact. I think that the day-grid that I went with ended up was a middle ground between it all. It's about 8 days from Ebonhawke to Ascalon City, and about 2.5 weeks in a straight line from Lion's Arch to Black Citadel. In the end, Rule of Fun is more important than exact detail, and for many groups hand waving long trips is preferable to dragging it out day by day, but it depends on who you are playing with. I know I set out on this journey starting to DM D&D for the first time by playing in a different universe than the game is set, with different mechanics, and I learned a lot in the process. I hope your game is enjoyable!

    Thanks! Everyone, including myself have been really looking forward to it.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Konig Des Todes.2086Konig Des Todes.2086 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 6, 2019

    @Kashin.7192 said:

    @Kalavier.1097 said:
    About travel times, there is actually an in universe example. I believe in Ghosts of Ascalon it's stated that the trip from Ebonhawke to AC took three-ish days, at a hard march with little breaks.

    I used the example from Sea of Sorrows. They said travel from Lion's Arch to the Black Citadel is 8 weeks march, 6 in good weather. Granted that was before even Hoelbrak was created, according to the book. So with some work, that is how I got the 2 days travel from Astorea to Brigid's Overlook.

    To clarify: the book details 2 nights (3 if you count camping right outside Ascalon City), but iirc, there's an implied (small) time skip, so we're not sure the exact timeframe but it is "at least three days / two nights"; and it wasn't at a hard march with little breaks the whole time, but rather that's just while with Rytlock's unit.

    It should also be expected that traveling from Black Citadel to Lion's Arch would be harder given that they're traversing through a mountain range, compared to Ebonhawke to Ascalon City which is mostly plains and a few canyons.

    (Also Hoelbrak existed during the time of Sea of Sorrows, by 50+ years depending on which section of SoS).

    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.

  • Aaron Ansari.1604Aaron Ansari.1604 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 7, 2019

    @Konig Des Todes.2086 said:

    (Also Hoelbrak existed during the time of Sea of Sorrows, by 50+ years depending on which section of SoS).

    If memory serves, though, the book does call Hoelbrak a minor waystop at one point, or at least something indicating it wasn't yet a settlement of any major size. That might be what Kashin's thinking of.

    EDIT: Chapter 27 (so 1256)- "If they made it that far, the caravan could reach the norn waycamp known as Hoelbrak before winter." But, on the other hand, the passage goes right on to say that it had a functioning asura gate already- given how expensive the novels established those are, Hoelbrak would have to already be pretty bustling.

    R.I.P., Old Man of Auld Red Wharf. Gone but never forgotten.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Aaron Ansari.1604 said:

    @Konig Des Todes.2086 said:

    (Also Hoelbrak existed during the time of Sea of Sorrows, by 50+ years depending on which section of SoS).

    If memory serves, though, the book does call Hoelbrak a minor waystop at one point, or at least something indicating it wasn't yet a settlement of any major size. That might be what Kashin's thinking of.

    EDIT: Chapter 27 (so 1256)- "If they made it that far, the caravan could reach the norn waycamp known as Hoelbrak before winter." But, on the other hand, the passage goes right on to say that it had a functioning asura gate already- given how expensive the novels established those are, Hoelbrak would have to already be pretty bustling.

    I recalled something was mentioned about it, yes. Thank you for digging that up Aaron!

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • draxynnic.3719draxynnic.3719 Member ✭✭✭✭

    When it comes to finance conversions....

    D&D usually runs on the principle of ten copper to a silver, ten silver (or 100 copper) to a gold. You could probably make a decent conversion of D&D prices to the GW2 economy by treating prices in gp as being in silver instead. So, to use 3.5 prices (which is what I'm used to) a basic weapon would be a handful of silver, a high-quality nonmagical weapon would be a few gold, while magical weapons would cost increasing quantities of gold, but still within the tens or hundreds of gold rather than the thousands.

    You could potentially make a nod to the use of platinum bars for bulk transactions.

  • Narcemus.1348Narcemus.1348 Member ✭✭✭

    Since mine is based on the Guild Wars 1 economy. I am using a system of copper being gold, because in the system 1000 copper equals 1 platinum. I then just converted the PHB equipment section information into platinum and moved on from there. I am trying to decide how I want to move forward. Part of me likes trying to continue to use the 5e system, and part of me wants to say enough with that and try to come up with my own system. But man that is a long process...

  • Svennis.3852Svennis.3852 Member ✭✭✭
    edited July 7, 2019

    If your campaign is very plot driven I’d say milestone leveling is best. It gives your players a sense of accomplishment when they defeat the BBEG of the story arc and get to level up.

    Personally I think counting exp is a hassle and too micro-managey, but that’s really up to your preference and DM style.

    EDIT: This sounds cool though! I wanna play in a GW2 campaign.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    We have our final tally of characters!

    Charr Engineer
    Charr Elementalist
    Charr Warrior
    Sylvari Elementalist
    Sylvari Guardian
    Human Warrior
    Kodan Ranger
    Kodan Necromancer

    Now I understand Charr Elementalist and Kodan Necromancer may not fit the Lore of their peoples. But we have some in game reasons as to why they have taken on these roles.

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • Konig Des Todes.2086Konig Des Todes.2086 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited July 14, 2019

    @Kashin.7192 said:
    Now I understand Charr Elementalist and Kodan Necromancer may not fit the Lore of their peoples.

    They do. Charr may dislike magic, but they haven't abandoned it. One of the charr biography warband mates is an elementalist, even.

    As for kodan necromancer: https://wiki.guildwars2.com/wiki/Final_Stillness Song of Final Exile once held profession trainers before they removed that stuff with the pre-HoT traitline rework. Curiously though, there was no thief or mesmer kodan (those trainers were human and norn respectively); perhaps due to their connection to denial and chaos magic.

    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.
    All these squares make a circle.

  • Kashin.7192Kashin.7192 Member ✭✭

    @Konig Des Todes.2086 said:

    @Kashin.7192 said:
    Now I understand Charr Elementalist and Kodan Necromancer may not fit the Lore of their peoples.

    They do. Charr may dislike magic, but they haven't abandoned it. One of the charr biography warband mates is an elementalist, even.

    As for kodan necromancer: https://wiki.guildwars2.com/wiki/Final_Stillness Song of Final Exile once held profession trainers before they removed that stuff with the pre-HoT traitline rework. Curiously though, there was no thief or mesmer kodan (those trainers were human and norn respectively); perhaps due to their connection to denial and chaos magic.

    Perfect! Thank you so much!

    Her invention, a navigational tool she had titled "the sextant". The first who laughed at the name found himself unable to speak properly for a week. The instrument had so revolutionized navigation that the city had named a section of the docks after her: Macha's Landing.

  • draxynnic.3719draxynnic.3719 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Roleplaying-wise, a charr elementalist who favours fire magic might get some extra flack and suspicion from other charr over charr magic-users in general, but magic users among the allied legions are in a state of essentially "distrusted but grudgingly accepted".

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