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Raids, fractals, strike missions & autistic troubles

I've been playing Guild Wars 2 for two and a half years, and I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome in 2013. Now we don't really talk about Asperger's syndrome but rather "Autism Spectrum Disorders" ( ASD) for different reasons.

I really like this game but I regret having to limit myself to PVE and the different contents of the Living World.

Indeed, I have tried to make raids several times, and I do from time to time a few fractals T1 or T2. I also did some Strike missions in Bjora.

The problem with fractals, raiding, and even with Strike missions is that I am quickly, in a way, overwhelmed by the multitude of visual and audio signals to perceive, manage and correctly interpret.

It is difficult for me to distinguish the multiple colored / transparent zones on the ground, those which are to be avoided, those towards which it is necessary to move, and even, sometimes, I sometimes lose sight of the boss, during one or two seconds. It is difficult for me to distinguish these zones from the overall visual and sound effects, which do not all have an importance in mechanics.

All this while trying to activate the best skills to get the best DPS, while trying to understand the mechanics of each boss, simultaneously trying to read and hear the instructions given by the different players.

If I add to this the need to keep an eye on the chat as well as to listen to what is said in the Discord channel, my brain is soon, after a few minutes, in a state of confusion and exhaustion which often lead me to give up.

I feel big frustration each time, for not being able to control my reaction to these many sensory stimuli, and for letting myself be invaded and overwhelmed by them and ultimately to achieve a disappointing result.

It often makes me sad, because it highlights my limits in this game that I love so much.

I would like to know if other players with autism spectrum disorders have problems identical to mine, or if they have possibly found a way to manage them better than I do.

Thanks for reading and sorry for the bad English.

Comments

  • ButcherofMalakir.4067ButcherofMalakir.4067 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Hello. I to have aspergers. I never had these kind of problems so I am not sure if this will help.

    Every time i do anything in life I first master the theory instead of actualy doing it. That means that in raids, there is nothing that can suprise me because I already know all posibilities.

    Most of the fight is scripted without changes. That means that you can study it so and then throw the visual input away.

    Then I create an algorythm what to do for everything that can happen. And a reaction to that. And the whole fight I just look for those few inputs. I dont see VG, i dont see the floor (since i just move on timerin my head), I dont see the chat, i dont see the seekers (since that is not my job). I only see greens and I only hear teleports. If I need to focus I dont hear discord either.

    And also If you master rotation to the ooint it is automatic, you have one less thing to pay attention to.

    Hope this helps

  • yann.1946yann.1946 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I don't have aspergers so I don't know how much the following will help.

    Their are some classes with way easier rotations then others. And it might be useful to look for a class where you only have to auto attack to do decent dps. That way you have 1 less thing to worry/focus on.

    Good luck
    :)

  • Unfortunately, my problem has little to do with rotations. My problem is the result of difficulties in correctly handling and interpreting an abundance of visual and audio stimuli, especially during strike missions, fractals and raids.

    There is so much to see and hear, that I can no longer see and hear correctly, nor especially to sort what is important from what is not, nor to identify the visual elements signaling a danger or requiring a specific action.

    There is a state of "overflow", a time when my brain can no longer interpret correctly, nor react correctly to everything that is visible on the screen.

  • Cameron.6450Cameron.6450 Member ✭✭

    I'm not sure if it would help, but there aren't a lot of raids that have critical audio cues, so turning the game volume to zero might help to remove some audio stimuli? You could also turn the graphics down very low. The game won't look as good, but it might strip back some of the flashy animations of other players that are unnecessary, and adding to the visual noise.

    Best of luck to you.

  • @Cameron.6450 said:
    I'm not sure if it would help, but there aren't a lot of raids that have critical audio cues, so turning the game volume to zero might help to remove some audio stimuli? You could also turn the graphics down very low. The game won't look as good, but it might strip back some of the flashy animations of other players that are unnecessary, and adding to the visual noise.

    Yes, that might perhaps make things easier for me, without resolving them completely, however.

    I repeat my original question, which was whether other people affected by autism have the same difficulties as me?

    I already have an interesting answer from ButcherofMalakir, but I guess it may not be representative of all players affected by this syndrome.

  • ButcherofMalakir.4067ButcherofMalakir.4067 Member ✭✭✭✭

    But from what I have seen most of the players in raids have similar (but not as severe) dificulty. The hardest part about raids is many inputs.

    And example I am lost on strikes because there was nowhere to learn mechanics before. So for me personaly, strikes are harder then raids. Not because of actualy dificulty but because i go in blind and team composition isnt udualy good so I cannot decide what mechanics are delt with by me and what by others.
    On the other hand in raids I have to deal with only few mechanics so I can filter everything else out.

    How to filter things out: firstly rarely there are more mechanics at the same time. So I can look at them as separate things. I know how the fight looks without any mechanics and I take that as if nothing is happening. And changes stands out
    Like first newtons law. An object either remains at rest or continues to move at a constant velocity, unless acted upon by a force. For me personaly, bossfight without mechanics is the same as if I am standing still.
    Another thing that helps me is music. Not loud but noticable so it drowns noises and helps me tied certain things to a timer. By music I mean 1 same song for the fight. This helps especialy when I am learning something new. Later I stop using it but it helps at the begining.

  • ButcherofMalakir thanks for your new answer.

    I have no possibility of filtering anything visually and acoustically.

    I have absolutely no idea how you manage to do this filtering, despite what you explain.

    And if I had to add soft music, it would further aggravate the sensory overflow which quickly turns into a painful sensation inside the skull.

    On the contrary, I have a habit, in fractals and in strike missions, of reducing the music of the game in order to remain able to hear the voices of the players on Discord and to discern the meaning of their words.

    It's a bit off topic: but I can't even listen to music while I'm reading a book. While reading a book, the slightest surrounding noise (neighbor doing DIY, etc.) can temporarily destroy my concentration and my attention.

    As we can often read, there are as many forms of autism as there are people with autism, and I think you and I may not have the same level of difficulty in sensory processing.

    Other than that, I would have thought that this post would arouse the interest of a greater number of autistic players. Perhaps we are not as numerous as I imagined in gw2 (which surprises me a little).

  • Vilin.8056Vilin.8056 Member ✭✭

    For me this is a common issue for not just a selective few, but almost everyone who's new to raid, so here's what I always do to help friend/guildies getting into these contents.

    1. Focus only onto the TWO major mechanic that can kill you. Most other damages can be neglected by your squad healer. I never tend to explain whole mechanics along the way because that's just too much information at a short amount of time.
    2. Simplify your rotation, find the biggest burst in your attack skill knowing that rest can be skipped if need be. I cannot stress how many raiders trying to emulate Snowcrow in a boss fight and failed to notice their surroundings.

    Add more spices and refinements as you repeat the same instance with more practice, good luck.

  • ButcherofMalakir.4067ButcherofMalakir.4067 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Not that many people use forums. And some autustic people have bigger problem with social interaction then me (was trained alot by my gf :D )

    I also have an ADHD so if something is fun, i have no trouble focusing and I focus very hard. On the other hand I lose focus quickly if something that doesnt interest me. I guess here it is an advantage.

    I alco cannot read without absolute silence. I have problem with bright light. But dont have problem here.

    So my adivise is to go to the settings, turn down character limit and character qualuty. That will turn off other players skills and alot of other visuals. Turn off music and ask your friends on discord to try to talk only between pulls if absolutely nececary.

  • Cerioth.7062Cerioth.7062 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Hello.

    I personally do not have asperger's or ASD in general, but I do have sensory processing disorder. I experience sensory stimuli overload in similar content as you do.

    I have succesfully raided and participated in PVP, WvW and other content with overwhelming amount of information. The way I have personally dealt with it was just taking my time, finding a group that is patient and letting you learn at your own pace. Focus on things that feel easier to you at first. Of course it would help if the game had more options for culling down some visuals and making certain telegraphs more clear to read. I personally struggle with visuals but am better with audio, so I focus on audio cues.

  • Axl.8924Axl.8924 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @ButcherofMalakir.4067 said:
    Not that many people use forums. And some autustic people have bigger problem with social interaction then me (was trained alot by my gf :D )

    I also have an ADHD so if something is fun, i have no trouble focusing and I focus very hard. On the other hand I lose focus quickly if something that doesnt interest me. I guess here it is an advantage.

    I alco cannot read without absolute silence. I have problem with bright light. But dont have problem here.

    So my adivise is to go to the settings, turn down character limit and character qualuty. That will turn off other players skills and alot of other visuals. Turn off music and ask your friends on discord to try to talk only between pulls if absolutely nececary.

    Are you sure its ADHD? ADHD is when you do something without thinking, a sort of automatically..

    ADD is where you split your attention between things.

    Here is my list of characters i got so far:

    Elementalist 80 with tempest:Talman nul
    Necromancer 80 with reaper:Zex vokar
    Mesmer level 80 no chrono yet:Klanga voosh.
    Level 80 Ranger with druid spec Jedkhan.

  • @Axl.8924 said:

    @ButcherofMalakir.4067 said:
    Not that many people use forums. And some autustic people have bigger problem with social interaction then me (was trained alot by my gf :D )

    I also have an ADHD so if something is fun, i have no trouble focusing and I focus very hard. On the other hand I lose focus quickly if something that doesnt interest me. I guess here it is an advantage.

    I alco cannot read without absolute silence. I have problem with bright light. But dont have problem here.

    So my adivise is to go to the settings, turn down character limit and character qualuty. That will turn off other players skills and alot of other visuals. Turn off music and ask your friends on discord to try to talk only between pulls if absolutely nececary.

    Are you sure its ADHD? ADHD is when you do something without thinking, a sort of automatically..

    ADD is where you split your attention between things.

    No, adhd is when you quickly lose attention if you are not "entertained". You dont have to focus on multiple things, you just frequently jump between them.
    Either you are having "fun" and so you are totaly enveloped in that thing and nothing else exists or you cannot focus on it for longer periodes of time.

    Also i do have ticks like tapping my foot, playing with mi wristband, drawing lines, chewing my pen, locking and unlocking my phone....

  • Axl.8924Axl.8924 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 14, 2020

    @ButcherofMalakir.4067 said:

    @Axl.8924 said:

    @ButcherofMalakir.4067 said:
    Not that many people use forums. And some autustic people have bigger problem with social interaction then me (was trained alot by my gf :D )

    I also have an ADHD so if something is fun, i have no trouble focusing and I focus very hard. On the other hand I lose focus quickly if something that doesnt interest me. I guess here it is an advantage.

    I alco cannot read without absolute silence. I have problem with bright light. But dont have problem here.

    So my adivise is to go to the settings, turn down character limit and character qualuty. That will turn off other players skills and alot of other visuals. Turn off music and ask your friends on discord to try to talk only between pulls if absolutely nececary.

    Are you sure its ADHD? ADHD is when you do something without thinking, a sort of automatically..

    ADD is where you split your attention between things.

    No, adhd is when you quickly lose attention if you are not "entertained". You dont have to focus on multiple things, you just frequently jump between them.
    Either you are having "fun" and so you are totaly enveloped in that thing and nothing else exists or you cannot focus on it for longer periodes of time.

    Also i do have ticks like tapping my foot, playing with mi wristband, drawing lines, chewing my pen, locking and unlocking my phone....

    https://www.additudemag.com/what-is-adhd-symptoms-causes-treatments/

    There is a difference between losing interest quickly if you aren't entertained, and something noticeably wrong where someone's attention is split around acting quickly.

    You could say to a kid he has ADHD but maybe he/she is simply short attention span, which is why i asked. I know because i am confirmed to have it for sure. Young kids especially can be impatient. Some videos on youtube are super short.

    This is what that page says:

    people with hyperactive-impulsive subtype of ADHD act “as if driven by a motor” with little impulse control — moving, squirming, and talking at even the most inappropriate times. They are impulsive, impatient, and interrupt others.
    People with the inattentive subtype of ADHD are easily distracted and forgetful. They may be daydreamers who lose track of homework, cell phones, and conversations with regularity.
    Individuals with combined-type ADHD display a mixture of all the symptoms outlined above.
    These subtypes are now considered “presentations” in the most recent version of the DSM, the DSM-V. Researchers determined that people often move from one subtype to another. For example, a child may present as primarily hyperactive-impulsive in preschool, and lose much of the hyperarousal in adolescence to fit the primarily inattentive presentation. In college and adulthood, the same individual may transition to combined presentation.
    The subtypes were primarily based on overt behavioral symptoms, and ignored less visible symptoms like emotional dysregulation, cognitive patterns, and sleep difficulties. Behavioral symptoms imperfectly capture the defining features of ADHD. Non-behavioral characteristics are increasingly recognized in research and diagnosis.

    What Are the 9 Symptoms of ADHD – Primarily Inattentive Type?
    Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or during other activities (e.g., overlooks or misses details, work is inaccurate).
    Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities (e.g., has difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy reading).
    Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly (e.g., mind seems elsewhere, even in the absence of any obvious distraction).
    Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily sidetracked).
    Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities (e.g., difficulty managing sequential tasks; difficulty keeping materials and belongings in order; messy, disorganized work; has poor time management; fails to meet deadlines).
    Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (e.g., schoolwork or homework; for older adolescents and adults, preparing reports, completing forms, reviewing lengthy papers).
    Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
    Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli (for older adolescents and adults, may include unrelated thoughts).
    Is often forgetful in daily activities (e.g., doing chores, running errands; for older adolescents and adults, returning calls, paying bills, keeping appointments).

    What Are the 9 Symptoms of ADHD – Primarily Hyperactive-Impulsive Type?
    Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet or squirms in seat.
    Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected (e.g., leaves his or her place in the classroom, in the office or other workplace, or in other situations that require remaining in place).
    Often runs about or climbs in situations where it is inappropriate. (Note: In adolescents or adults, may be limited to feeling restless.)
    Often unable to play or engage in leisure activities quietly.
    Is often “on the go,” acting as if “driven by a motor” (e.g., is unable to be or uncomfortable being still for extended time, as in restaurants, meetings; may be experienced by others as being restless or difficult to keep up with).
    Often talks excessively.
    Often blurts out an answer before a question has been completed (e.g., completes people’s sentences; cannot wait for turn in conversation).
    Often has difficulty waiting his or her turn (e.g., while waiting in line).
    Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations, games, or activities; may start using other people’s things without asking or receiving permission; for adolescents and adults, may intrude into or take over what others

    Its a very long list of symptoms.

    If this person has ADHD, then maybe they should seek help from a doctor rather than here.

    Only thing i can advise is: don't be watching any videos or anything, don't be reading while hearing a raid leader explain, and make sure to ask nicely that everyone speak 1 person at a time, and explain nicely that its hard to follow. Try to focus on one thing at a time, because thats how i do it.

    If the person is explaining a raid and lets say his name is cerioth lets say, use all your ounce of focus on hearing what serioth say, ignore the texts of others.

    I have explained that something can be hard to follow to leaders if a bunch of people interrupt eachother. It is definitely easier to follow if a bunch of people don't interrupt eachother.

    Here is my list of characters i got so far:

    Elementalist 80 with tempest:Talman nul
    Necromancer 80 with reaper:Zex vokar
    Mesmer level 80 no chrono yet:Klanga voosh.
    Level 80 Ranger with druid spec Jedkhan.

  • @Axl.8924 said:

    @ButcherofMalakir.4067 said:

    @Axl.8924 said:

    @ButcherofMalakir.4067 said:
    Not that many people use forums. And some autustic people have bigger problem with social interaction then me (was trained alot by my gf :D )

    I also have an ADHD so if something is fun, i have no trouble focusing and I focus very hard. On the other hand I lose focus quickly if something that doesnt interest me. I guess here it is an advantage.

    I alco cannot read without absolute silence. I have problem with bright light. But dont have problem here.

    So my adivise is to go to the settings, turn down character limit and character qualuty. That will turn off other players skills and alot of other visuals. Turn off music and ask your friends on discord to try to talk only between pulls if absolutely nececary.

    Are you sure its ADHD? ADHD is when you do something without thinking, a sort of automatically..

    ADD is where you split your attention between things.

    No, adhd is when you quickly lose attention if you are not "entertained". You dont have to focus on multiple things, you just frequently jump between them.
    Either you are having "fun" and so you are totaly enveloped in that thing and nothing else exists or you cannot focus on it for longer periodes of time.

    Also i do have ticks like tapping my foot, playing with mi wristband, drawing lines, chewing my pen, locking and unlocking my phone....

    https://www.additudemag.com/what-is-adhd-symptoms-causes-treatments/

    There is a difference between losing interest quickly if you aren't entertained, and something noticeably wrong where someone's attention is split around acting quickly.

    You could say to a kid he has ADHD but maybe he/she is simply short attention span, which is why i asked. I know because i am confirmed to have it for sure. Young kids especially can be impatient. Some videos on youtube are super short.

    This is what that page says:

    people with hyperactive-impulsive subtype of ADHD act “as if driven by a motor” with little impulse control — moving, squirming, and talking at even the most inappropriate times. They are impulsive, impatient, and interrupt others.
    People with the inattentive subtype of ADHD are easily distracted and forgetful. They may be daydreamers who lose track of homework, cell phones, and conversations with regularity.
    Individuals with combined-type ADHD display a mixture of all the symptoms outlined above.
    These subtypes are now considered “presentations” in the most recent version of the DSM, the DSM-V. Researchers determined that people often move from one subtype to another. For example, a child may present as primarily hyperactive-impulsive in preschool, and lose much of the hyperarousal in adolescence to fit the primarily inattentive presentation. In college and adulthood, the same individual may transition to combined presentation.
    The subtypes were primarily based on overt behavioral symptoms, and ignored less visible symptoms like emotional dysregulation, cognitive patterns, and sleep difficulties. Behavioral symptoms imperfectly capture the defining features of ADHD. Non-behavioral characteristics are increasingly recognized in research and diagnosis.

    What Are the 9 Symptoms of ADHD – Primarily Inattentive Type?
    Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or during other activities (e.g., overlooks or misses details, work is inaccurate).
    Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities (e.g., has difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy reading).
    Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly (e.g., mind seems elsewhere, even in the absence of any obvious distraction).
    Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily sidetracked).
    Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities (e.g., difficulty managing sequential tasks; difficulty keeping materials and belongings in order; messy, disorganized work; has poor time management; fails to meet deadlines).
    Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (e.g., schoolwork or homework; for older adolescents and adults, preparing reports, completing forms, reviewing lengthy papers).
    Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
    Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli (for older adolescents and adults, may include unrelated thoughts).
    Is often forgetful in daily activities (e.g., doing chores, running errands; for older adolescents and adults, returning calls, paying bills, keeping appointments).

    What Are the 9 Symptoms of ADHD – Primarily Hyperactive-Impulsive Type?
    Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet or squirms in seat.
    Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected (e.g., leaves his or her place in the classroom, in the office or other workplace, or in other situations that require remaining in place).
    Often runs about or climbs in situations where it is inappropriate. (Note: In adolescents or adults, may be limited to feeling restless.)
    Often unable to play or engage in leisure activities quietly.
    Is often “on the go,” acting as if “driven by a motor” (e.g., is unable to be or uncomfortable being still for extended time, as in restaurants, meetings; may be experienced by others as being restless or difficult to keep up with).
    Often talks excessively.
    Often blurts out an answer before a question has been completed (e.g., completes people’s sentences; cannot wait for turn in conversation).
    Often has difficulty waiting his or her turn (e.g., while waiting in line).
    Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations, games, or activities; may start using other people’s things without asking or receiving permission; for adolescents and adults, may intrude into or take over what others

    Its a very long list of symptoms.

    If this person has ADHD, then maybe they should seek help from a doctor rather than here.

    Only thing i can advise is: don't be watching any videos or anything, don't be reading while hearing a raid leader explain, and make sure to ask nicely that everyone speak 1 person at a time, and explain nicely that its hard to follow. Try to focus on one thing at a time, because thats how i do it.

    If the person is explaining a raid and lets say his name is cerioth lets say, use all your ounce of focus on hearing what serioth say, ignore the texts of others.

    I have explained that something can be hard to follow to leaders if a bunch of people interrupt eachother. It is definitely easier to follow if a bunch of people don't interrupt eachother.

    I have all of these symptoms. But you dont split attention. I cannot have attention on more then one thing. If I try doing 2 things I am not focused at eithet. More like I jump from things very quickly

  • Mikali.9651Mikali.9651 Member ✭✭✭

    accept yourself and that's it, the World will not change for such a minority. You are bad in some things, but great in other things. Try to focus better no matter what, if you can't - you can't, and move on with your life.

  • Cynder.2509Cynder.2509 Member ✭✭✭

    Same problem here but I also have a motorized disability making controls with keyboard and mouse much more difficult and even painful sometimes as I get very hard cramping in my hands often followed by heavy sweating (which causes my fingers to slip) and even panic attacks. This made it very hard for me return to raid content after years. Would be nice if people like us would team up together instead of always ending up with "normal" people who expect ultimate perfection.
    Anyways, I wish you good luck.

    I'm Hunter, he/him
    Character infos: https://is-it-because-im-charr.tumblr.com/charactersgw2

  • Ertrak.9506Ertrak.9506 Member ✭✭✭
    edited March 19, 2020

    I have ASD. I consider myself a successful raider (i have cleared all bosses hundreds of times). Maybe I can help you a little bit.

    I am going to use Vale Guardian (wing 1 boss 1) as an example here. Beyond that i would ask that you give me specific bosses you've done. I am also assuming youre playing a DPS role, as training for a boss shouldn't put you into a critical role before you even understand the bosses mechanics ASD or not.

    One thing you can do is turn game sounds completely off. I don't particularly like doing this as i dissociate from the game when i do, but, if youre overstimulating, or having sensory overload, I would suggest it. Secondly, if you lose track of the boss, make ur character take 2 steps back and take a few seconds to re-focus. Literally back away (not like run across the map, just a few steps back so youre within heal/boon range) and just stop ur rotation. A couple seconds of doing nothing so you end up not dying is better than getting teleported across the arena and/or dead, which leads me to my next point:

    As a dps there are only 2 things for you to worry about: avoiding blue circle under your feet and damaging the boss. Always prioritize in that order. Tip of advise here. dont worry about looking for the aoe underneath you, just watch the edge of your screen. Just like the "freezing" effect, or purple glow whe you get stunned or dazed, if your standing in a mechanic that will negatively affect you an orange flamey thing will appear around your screen. If you see that, move or dodge. You do not need to worry about green circles or the red seekers. Most teams, even training teams should be overhealing green circles and managing the red seekers should be handled by your tank or supports (team comp depending).

    Teamwork a big part of raiding that will help you from being overwhelmed. Focus on your role. Trust your team to do theirs. Once you learn to better handle the boss it will become less taxing/exhausting and then you can start to learn to step in if your teammate gets caught and cant go do a mechanic.

    @Vilin.8056 said:
    For me this is a common issue for not just a selective few, but almost everyone who's new to raid, so here's what I always do to help friend/guildies getting into these contents.

    1. Focus only onto the TWO major mechanic that can kill you. Most other damages can be neglected by your squad healer. I never tend to explain whole mechanics along the way because that's just too much information at a short amount of time.
    2. Simplify your rotation, find the biggest burst in your attack skill knowing that rest can be skipped if need be. I cannot stress how many raiders trying to emulate Snowcrow in a boss fight and failed to notice their surroundings.

    Add more spices and refinements as you repeat the same instance with more practice, good luck.

    I also recommend this.

  • Aridon.8362Aridon.8362 Member ✭✭✭

    Don't give up OP, you're an admirable individual.

  • vesica tempestas.1563vesica tempestas.1563 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 28, 2020

    Op Ive had aspergers since I was a child, and I've learned to take advantage of the certain aspects. I've been a dev for 20 years and was a very successful raider one apon a time before family commitment took over. As a developer I take advantage on our ability to tunnel vision on a thing, and can spend 8 hours solid working through static code analysis for example. It's known that a higher proportion of devs have autistic traits for reasons like this. Equally, raiding requires rote memorisation of patterns which is right down our street, the trick is to identify the patterns you need to learn for your role, and tunnel on to it, and ignore the rest.

    So my message is, take advantage of the strengths of your condition. And learn to mitigate or avoid the negatives, :)

    "Any path that narrows future possibilities may become a lethal trap. Humans do not thread their way through a maze; they scan a vast horizon filled with unique opportunities." - The Spacing Guild Handbook.

    Beware the meta!