How do you become a GM? — Guild Wars 2 Forums

How do you become a GM?

I recently got contacted by a GM, he/she was sooooo friendly and that raised the question...
How does someone become a GM?

Do you know?

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Comments

  • So you don't need to be a FX Artist, or design programmer... there's a small chance you can get the role just by "wanting to help the community" ?

  • Inculpatus cedo.9234Inculpatus cedo.9234 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited December 27, 2017

    I would image having game security experience would be most helpful.

    According to the Job Listings, there are no positions open in Security at the present time.

    But, there's always this:

    For career interests,
    please send correspondence to:
    [email protected]

    Good luck.

  • Anyone on else who has got experience with this?

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited December 27, 2017

    GW2 doesn't have GMs who are players volunteering their time to help out, they are all Anet staff. And yes, its way dedicated role, they're not artists or programmers or whatever acting as GMs occasionally.

    So it is something you could do, but it's a job: meaning you need to be legally allowed to work in the USA and need to either live near Seattle (where their office is) or be able to relocate. You also need to have the right qualifications and experience and will need to go through the application and interview process to get it. On the plus side it also means you get paid and get benefits.

    I don't know what the qualifications are for the customer support people, but I'd imagine some experience in customer service and knowledge of how the video game industry works would be helpful.

    If you want to do it the best option now is to keep checking their job openings for things you can apply for, and maybe look for similar jobs at other companies to get experience (if necessary, you might have it already) and hopefully move to Anet later when a job comes up.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation (EU). Mini Pet Collector.

    "Life's a journey, not a destination." "The truth is somewhere in the middle, that's why I prefer the edge."

  • Although there are no specialised degrees, both experience and degrees in the direction of customer service or technical support will help a lot. Specially if you also have degrees and/or experience in security.

  • Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    I'll have two number 9s, a number 9 large, a number 6 with extra dip, a number 7, two number 45s, one with cheese, and a large soda.

  • MarkoNS.3261MarkoNS.3261 Member ✭✭✭

    @Mutaki Novayo.5613 said:
    I recently got contacted by a GM, he/she was sooooo friendly and that raised the question...
    How does someone become a GM?

    Do you know?

    make a blood sacrifice to Santa.

    Kittenizer Tm in Full ACTION.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:
    Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    Yeah if you just want to show people around or answer questions in-game anyone can do that. You don't even need a mentor tag, that's only really useful as a map marker.

    But that's very different to what the GMs do, they're the people who answer support tickets and can do things like restore lost items or fix problems with your account.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation (EU). Mini Pet Collector.

    "Life's a journey, not a destination." "The truth is somewhere in the middle, that's why I prefer the edge."

  • @Danikat.8537 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:
    Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    Yeah if you just want to show people around or answer questions in-game anyone can do that. You don't even need a mentor tag, that's only really useful as a map marker.

    But that's very different to what the GMs do, they're the people who answer support tickets and can do things like restore lost items or fix problems with your account.

    Oh right. So GM is more like employ at office answering e-mails etc

    I'll have two number 9s, a number 9 large, a number 6 with extra dip, a number 7, two number 45s, one with cheese, and a large soda.

  • @sokeenoppa.5384 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:
    Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    Yeah if you just want to show people around or answer questions in-game anyone can do that. You don't even need a mentor tag, that's only really useful as a map marker.

    But that's very different to what the GMs do, they're the people who answer support tickets and can do things like restore lost items or fix problems with your account.

    Oh right. So GM is more like employ at office answering e-mails etc

    More or less.
    GM's are the term for arenanet employees who work in ticket handling and/or security. But the term GM is commonly used for their PC in the game. This is cause they have special powers. Many of these powers are unknown to us in detail, but they include tools to suspend or ban accounts and also to reverse an account to a previously saved version (e.g. to undo the work of hackers)

    The other tools are mostly unknown to us, but likely include tools to monitor and watch us and also to look into log files. Their PC are recognisable cause their name starts with GM and they can sent mails to players without the warning that it is sent to you by another player. They are also part of the Arenanet guild and have the arenanet logo next to their name

    Make sure that when you encounter a GM you verify it really is one. Ask them sent you an ingame mail or come to you. It is a very common scam to impersonate a GM for fraud and swindel.

  • @mercury ranique.2170 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:
    Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    Yeah if you just want to show people around or answer questions in-game anyone can do that. You don't even need a mentor tag, that's only really useful as a map marker.

    But that's very different to what the GMs do, they're the people who answer support tickets and can do things like restore lost items or fix problems with your account.

    Oh right. So GM is more like employ at office answering e-mails etc

    More or less.
    GM's are the term for arenanet employees who work in ticket handling and/or security. But the term GM is commonly used for their PC in the game. This is cause they have special powers. Many of these powers are unknown to us in detail, but they include tools to suspend or ban accounts and also to reverse an account to a previously saved version (e.g. to undo the work of hackers)

    The other tools are mostly unknown to us, but likely include tools to monitor and watch us and also to look into log files. Their PC are recognisable cause their name starts with GM and they can sent mails to players without the warning that it is sent to you by another player. They are also part of the Arenanet guild and have the arenanet logo next to their name

    Make sure that when you encounter a GM you verify it really is one. Ask them sent you an ingame mail or come to you. It is a very common scam to impersonate a GM for fraud and swindel.

    You seem to know a lot about GM's, how if I may ask?

  • sorudo.9054sorudo.9054 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Mutaki Novayo.5613 said:

    @mercury ranique.2170 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:
    Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    Yeah if you just want to show people around or answer questions in-game anyone can do that. You don't even need a mentor tag, that's only really useful as a map marker.

    But that's very different to what the GMs do, they're the people who answer support tickets and can do things like restore lost items or fix problems with your account.

    Oh right. So GM is more like employ at office answering e-mails etc

    More or less.
    GM's are the term for arenanet employees who work in ticket handling and/or security. But the term GM is commonly used for their PC in the game. This is cause they have special powers. Many of these powers are unknown to us in detail, but they include tools to suspend or ban accounts and also to reverse an account to a previously saved version (e.g. to undo the work of hackers)

    The other tools are mostly unknown to us, but likely include tools to monitor and watch us and also to look into log files. Their PC are recognisable cause their name starts with GM and they can sent mails to players without the warning that it is sent to you by another player. They are also part of the Arenanet guild and have the arenanet logo next to their name

    Make sure that when you encounter a GM you verify it really is one. Ask them sent you an ingame mail or come to you. It is a very common scam to impersonate a GM for fraud and swindel.

    You seem to know a lot about GM's, how if I may ask?

    anyone who has played long enough and does more then just playing games knows all that, i used to make mods for games and even tried a total mod.
    it's kinda common knowledge, play long enough and it becomes obvious.

  • @Mutaki Novayo.5613 said:

    @mercury ranique.2170 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:

    @sokeenoppa.5384 said:
    Isnt mentor tag made for helping ppl out?

    Yeah if you just want to show people around or answer questions in-game anyone can do that. You don't even need a mentor tag, that's only really useful as a map marker.

    But that's very different to what the GMs do, they're the people who answer support tickets and can do things like restore lost items or fix problems with your account.

    Oh right. So GM is more like employ at office answering e-mails etc

    More or less.
    GM's are the term for arenanet employees who work in ticket handling and/or security. But the term GM is commonly used for their PC in the game. This is cause they have special powers. Many of these powers are unknown to us in detail, but they include tools to suspend or ban accounts and also to reverse an account to a previously saved version (e.g. to undo the work of hackers)

    The other tools are mostly unknown to us, but likely include tools to monitor and watch us and also to look into log files. Their PC are recognisable cause their name starts with GM and they can sent mails to players without the warning that it is sent to you by another player. They are also part of the Arenanet guild and have the arenanet logo next to their name

    Make sure that when you encounter a GM you verify it really is one. Ask them sent you an ingame mail or come to you. It is a very common scam to impersonate a GM for fraud and swindel.

    You seem to know a lot about GM's, how if I may ask?

    I've played both GW1 and GW2 for many years. Also I work as a support engineer for a multinational in agro-culture.

  • Rezzet.3614Rezzet.3614 Member ✭✭✭

    Is there a position open for meme'r?

  • Hot Boy.7138Hot Boy.7138 Member ✭✭✭

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    GW2 doesn't have GMs who are players volunteering their time to help out, they are all Anet staff. And yes, its way dedicated role, they're not artists or programmers or whatever acting as GMs occasionally.

    So it is something you could do, but it's a job: meaning you need to be legally allowed to work in the USA and need to either live near Seattle (where their office is) or be able to relocate. You also need to have the right qualifications and experience and will need to go through the application and interview process to get it. On the plus side it also means you get paid and get benefits.

    I don't know what the qualifications are for the customer support people, but I'd imagine some experience in customer service and knowledge of how the video game industry works would be helpful.

    If you want to do it the best option now is to keep checking their job openings for things you can apply for, and maybe look for similar jobs at other companies to get experience (if necessary, you might have it already) and hopefully move to Anet later when a job comes up.

    Do GMs work from home?

  • kharmin.7683kharmin.7683 Member ✭✭✭

    @Hot Boy.7138 said:

    Do GMs work from home?

    I don't believe so.

    I am a very casual player.
    Very.
    Casual.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I don't know but as far as I remember all the jobs I've seen Anet advertising say you have to be able to get to their office, so you have to live nearby or be willing to relocate.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation (EU). Mini Pet Collector.

    "Life's a journey, not a destination." "The truth is somewhere in the middle, that's why I prefer the edge."

  • Theros.1390Theros.1390 Member ✭✭✭

    Oh god,

    Be a GM is much more than help the community.

    Be a GM is also : hunting bots and remove em, reviewing ALL the reports and do what's necessary. It's also answer to all the players tickets (the bulk of their work I guess, especially nowadays). I really think it's a much harder work than some imagine. x)

    Of course, you have to be passionated, by the game, by the desire of help the community. But I'm sure you also have to be though sometimes, because a day may be hard at work (Lot of tickets, conflict with players for a ticket, a contested suspension...)

    I personally regret that GMs are so focused on tickets and reports treatment, I'd love to see them more in game to remove AFK farmers, keep the chat under surveillance, or even to talk a bit with the community and answering to players' questions in the chat.

  • Fremtid.3528Fremtid.3528 Member ✭✭✭

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    GW2 doesn't have GMs who are players volunteering their time to help out, they are all Anet staff. And yes, its way dedicated role, they're not artists or programmers or whatever acting as GMs occasionally.

    So it is something you could do, but it's a job: meaning you need to be legally allowed to work in the USA and need to either live near Seattle (where their office is) or be able to relocate. You also need to have the right qualifications and experience and will need to go through the application and interview process to get it. On the plus side it also means you get paid and get benefits.

    I don't know what the qualifications are for the customer support people, but I'd imagine some experience in customer service and knowledge of how the video game industry works would be helpful.

    If you want to do it the best option now is to keep checking their job openings for things you can apply for, and maybe look for similar jobs at other companies to get experience (if necessary, you might have it already) and hopefully move to Anet later when a job comes up.

    There's EU GMs and I don't know where the office is I think there's two different ones, I think one is in England, but I remember I read a tweet that they were looking for people in EU positions that spoke more than one language. And surely for the EU servers they would need someone online during EU hours.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @starlinvf.1358 said:
    Just to add an air of caution, to realize that this is "Customer Service" job, and that this type of work REQUIRES the ability to deal with all kind of different people. And by "all kinds" I mostly mean rude, uncooperative, and sometimes belligerent people. You have to be thick skinned, level headed, able to tolerate some really stupid policies and/or management decisions, and a level of interpersonal communication skills that rival that of a crisis negotiator...... For without them, it becomes the most soul crushing of soul crushing jobs, when 80% of your interactions are with customers who are, or are about to be upset about something You had no involvement with until that moment.

    I've done phone support, enterprise support, user admin, technical support and did a stint as a field tech...... and in that time, my bar for the average human being has been lowered substantially. And its not so much that people are bad (even though they are)..... but you are very much exposed to the lower half of the average, and prolonged exposure leads to some philosophical and existential crisis. But if you can get past all that, then the only thing you need to worry about is minor depression, with an increased academic interest in the principles of natural selection.

    Cheers!

    And yet, somehow, there are people out there who genuinely like doing it. At least in the right context.

    I'm a biologist by training and I work for a wildlife conservation organisation but a major part of my job over the past 7 years has been basically customer service - dealing with enquiries from the public about our work. The people and the queries both cover a wider range than I suspect most people could imagine, from the most wonderful, kind, enthusiastic people to some truly horrible or incomprehensibly stupid individuals. (On more than one occasion I've had to warn someone that they just told me they're planning to break the law, and sometimes I've actually had to report them to the police.) Or it can just be dull, repetitive and frustrating (e.g. feeling like I've spent all day telling people how to log into our website "yes you need to type in your entire username...if you normally just type the first letter and then it comes up it's because your browser had saved it, no I can't change your browser settings, no I can't read your password to you over the phone...")

    And yet I love my job and sometimes my favourite enquiries are the ones which start off negative or frustrating or totally incomprehensible because they can be the most rewarding when you finally get it sorted. I think it helps a lot though that it's something which is important to me and I know the people I deal with are usually so...passionate because it's important to them too, even if we completely disagree.

    Which is a big change from when I worked in retail. It's a lot harder to care when someone is screaming in your face (literally) about something which, even for them, is pretty trivial like a game they want being out of stock or non-existent (you would not believe how many people wanted to buy Mario Kart for the Xbox) or because they couldn't be bothered to read more than 3 words of a poster and guessed at what the promotion was based on that. (2-for-1 on selected DS games is not the same as 2-for-1 on everything in store and no law requires a retailer to honour every insane interpretation of a promotion you can dream up).

    I imagine customer support for GW2, at least for me, would fall somewhere between those two.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation (EU). Mini Pet Collector.

    "Life's a journey, not a destination." "The truth is somewhere in the middle, that's why I prefer the edge."

  • I never saw any anet worker or had any contact with a GM in game.

  • Aeolus.3615Aeolus.3615 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 10, 2018

    GM is a set of feature/roles that is given to companies employees playing their own game or given a support role towards the community management.
    Study hard, and then send CV to Anet :)

    @ProtoGunner.4953 ive seen quite some of them, and sometimes been ganked by some ._. i hate them lol...

  • Fremtid.3528Fremtid.3528 Member ✭✭✭

    @Gaile Gray.6029 said:
    What some call GMs -- who are in fact our Customer Services reps -- usually come from a customer service or support background. They may have had experience in another game, or in a different type of work environment, but generally they have worked pretty extensively with the public. Good writing and problem-solving skills are a strong feature of the role. In the CS job descriptions I've seen (and have sometimes written for Anet ;) ) a background in game security is not usually listed, although that could be a helpful thing to have. CS Reps are different than community managers, although we communicate with one another daily.

    One question that comes up a lot is, "Can I work as a GM from home?" And the answer is that we hire agents who will work on-site, not from home. Another question is, "Do you have volunteers or player-GMs?" And the answer to that, also, is no. All CS Reps work as employees.

    Oh and as for playing the game all day (which I saw in a comment), CS Reps are busy helping players and seldom have time to play the game during work hours. Other folks who would be more engaged in "playing the game" -- which is really more testing the game and fixing bugs -- would be members of the QA Team, but they, too, seldom just laze around playing, but are in the game for a purpose.

    You do have CS reps who work in Europe though right?

  • Ashen.2907Ashen.2907 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Get bitten by a radioactive G?

  • I really enjoy mentoring on low starter maps. Do it almost daily for the last couple of weeks/month. But.. I wouldn't want that as a job. Or do customer service.

    I work for an... educational business. Our customers are from the lower 10% of society. And it is soul crushing. I imagine working in QS in a gaming company must be worse.

  • Tatwi.3562Tatwi.3562 Member ✭✭

    @Gaile Gray.6029 said:
    One question that comes up a lot is, "Can I work as a GM from home?" And the answer is that we hire agents who will work on-site, not from home. Another question is, "Do you have volunteers or player-GMs?" And the answer to that, also, is no. All CS Reps work as employees.

    Glad to hear both of those things. Customer service is a job. Jobs are work. Do work, get paid. Real simple! :)
    If I lived in the area, I would apply, provided the wages covered the insane cost of living in your area. I've read housing is pretty awful out your way.

    Keep up the excellent work, eh!

    Sincerely,
    Former "Cable guy" and tech support agent for an HP contractor.

  • Algreg.3629Algreg.3629 Member ✭✭✭
    edited August 11, 2018

    I think you have a wrong idea about GMs and the gaming industry. Being a GM is more or less a mundane deskjob in CRM - and that field can be one of the more soulcrushing ones. It probably does not differ much from working CRM for a real estate corporation or online retail. In general, the gaming industry is far from being all fun. Having a PR/marketing background myself, all I have heard from these fields it must be hell with insane deadlines and always a kitten-storm lurking behind the next corner. I imagine in other departments there will also be a LOT of pressure. A fun product does not necessarily tell of a fun industry.

  • Id just work for anet to command as anet driver and claim middle castle in wvw.

  • @Fremtid.3528 said:

    @Gaile Gray.6029 said:
    What some call GMs -- who are in fact our Customer Services reps -- usually come from a customer service or support background. They may have had experience in another game, or in a different type of work environment, but generally they have worked pretty extensively with the public. Good writing and problem-solving skills are a strong feature of the role. In the CS job descriptions I've seen (and have sometimes written for Anet ;) ) a background in game security is not usually listed, although that could be a helpful thing to have. CS Reps are different than community managers, although we communicate with one another daily.

    One question that comes up a lot is, "Can I work as a GM from home?" And the answer is that we hire agents who will work on-site, not from home. Another question is, "Do you have volunteers or player-GMs?" And the answer to that, also, is no. All CS Reps work as employees.

    Oh and as for playing the game all day (which I saw in a comment), CS Reps are busy helping players and seldom have time to play the game during work hours. Other folks who would be more engaged in "playing the game" -- which is really more testing the game and fixing bugs -- would be members of the QA Team, but they, too, seldom just laze around playing, but are in the game for a purpose.

    You do have CS reps who work in Europe though right?

    .

    @Gaile Gray.6029 said:
    we hire agents who will work on-site, not from home.

    I think this part suggests not. All work out of anets office in the US.
    At least that's how I interpret this statement.

  • CJH.2879CJH.2879 Member ✭✭

    About 22 years ago I helped a friend of mine on a discussion forum that he created, yes he was a programmer (among other things), he gave me GM status & I will admit the task was not an easy one. It essentially involved going through every single topic/message that was posted & keeping an eye out for any kind of toxicity (discrimination/racism/flagrant swearing ect ect). One thing I did learn was that its something you have to stay vigilant on, things can spiral out of control very quickly & I always tried to approach the task with a "firm but fair" attitude. Its also a case of trying to separate your personal feelings towards a subject from the requirements of the job you are doing + all of thats involved with it. You'll come across people from all walks of life & there are times that a ban or deletion of a specific account do come into play. In the end its all about finding the right balance & recognizing if a person has overstepped there mark or if everything is ok. The work I did at that time on another forum wasn't paid work, it was just helping out a friend when internet was just first appearing in the world (along with bulletin boards, private servers & the old modems that made that annoying screeching sound lol). =)

  • There is a LOT of improvement Anet can benefit from. I'm curious about the process and the oversight of those hired to handle this kind of job.

    In my years of customer service, especially game support, I haven't met very many with good problem-solving skills. Quality control also fails when you can't report terrible service either.

  • Ben K.6238Ben K.6238 Member ✭✭✭
    edited August 13, 2018

    @starlinvf.1358 said:
    Just to add an air of caution, to realize that this is "Customer Service" job, and that this type of work REQUIRES the ability to deal with all kind of different people. And by "all kinds" I mostly mean rude, uncooperative, and sometimes belligerent people. You have to be thick skinned, level headed, able to tolerate some really stupid policies and/or management decisions, and a level of interpersonal communication skills that rival that of a crisis negotiator...... For without them, it becomes the most soul crushing of soul crushing jobs, when 80% of your interactions are with customers who are, or are about to be upset about something You had no involvement with until that moment.

    I've done phone support, enterprise support, user admin, technical support and did a stint as a field tech...... and in that time, my bar for the average human being has been lowered substantially. And its not so much that people are bad (even though they are)..... but you are very much exposed to the lower half of the average, and prolonged exposure leads to some philosophical and existential crisis. But if you can get past all that, then the only thing you need to worry about is minor depression, with an increased academic interest in the principles of natural selection.

    Cheers!

    But at the same time, you're there to try to fix those problems and make unhappy people happy wherever possible. The only ones that really suck are the ones where someone's broken the EULA badly enough to lose their account, and there ain't no coming back from that.

    The list of skills is pretty accurate, but missing one: you need to have impeccable written communication. Bad grammar or typos get interpreted as signs of incompetence really easily.

    Policies do have quite an impact on the job as well. The... shall we say, unpopular ban on matchup threads in the WvW forum is actually a very good move, as it saves a lot of work that could be much more productively spent on solving more important problems.

  • Nate.3927Nate.3927 Member ✭✭

    @Artemis Thuras.8795 said:

    @Fremtid.3528 said:

    @Gaile Gray.6029 said:
    What some call GMs -- who are in fact our Customer Services reps -- usually come from a customer service or support background. They may have had experience in another game, or in a different type of work environment, but generally they have worked pretty extensively with the public. Good writing and problem-solving skills are a strong feature of the role. In the CS job descriptions I've seen (and have sometimes written for Anet ;) ) a background in game security is not usually listed, although that could be a helpful thing to have. CS Reps are different than community managers, although we communicate with one another daily.

    One question that comes up a lot is, "Can I work as a GM from home?" And the answer is that we hire agents who will work on-site, not from home. Another question is, "Do you have volunteers or player-GMs?" And the answer to that, also, is no. All CS Reps work as employees.

    Oh and as for playing the game all day (which I saw in a comment), CS Reps are busy helping players and seldom have time to play the game during work hours. Other folks who would be more engaged in "playing the game" -- which is really more testing the game and fixing bugs -- would be members of the QA Team, but they, too, seldom just laze around playing, but are in the game for a purpose.

    You do have CS reps who work in Europe though right?

    .

    @Gaile Gray.6029 said:
    we hire agents who will work on-site, not from home.

    I think this part suggests not. All work out of anets office in the US.
    At least that's how I interpret this statement.

    it really depends, are customer service working from Anet offices? or from NCSOFT offices? or a combination of both? If it's one of the latter two, I can imagine NCSOFT would have an office somewhere in Europe, so they might have customer service reps that are based in the European office.

  • ArenaNet CS Teams only work for ArenaNet at the ArenaNet offices. NCSoft Support has their own teams, in their own offices.

  • Yannir.4132Yannir.4132 Member ✭✭✭

    @Nate.3927 said:
    it really depends, are customer service working from Anet offices? or from NCSOFT offices? or a combination of both? If it's one of the latter two, I can imagine NCSOFT would have an office somewhere in Europe, so they might have customer service reps that are based in the European office.

    NCSoft and ArenaNet are associated VERY loosely, NCSoft basically has 0 interaction with Anet and their games on a daily basis. The only time NCSofts name pops up is when there's some sort of advertising of another NCSoft property. Anything and everything directly related to the game is handled by ANet.

  • Fremtid.3528Fremtid.3528 Member ✭✭✭

    I'm pretty sure I remember an ad on twitter from Anet looking for someone who was bilingual to work in Europe that's why I was asking. I don't know maybe I imagined it.

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