What is your definition of casual gaming? — Guild Wars 2 Forums

What is your definition of casual gaming?

I see the term tossed around a lot but without a solid definition. Rather than calling a person as a casual gamer per say I see it as applied to the activity the person is doing at the moment.

For myself I think of activities like wondering the open world doing events and farming as more casual gaming. On the other hand doing the game story, raids, fractals, PvP and WvW more depth and not casual at all. Basically I think any kind of activity in the game that you can drop at a moment's notice as a casual activity. A player may do casual activities one day and more dedicated another. I doubt a truly casual gamer would touch MMOs much as by nature MMOs require a certain amount of dedication.

What do you think casual gaming and gamer is? Do you define yourself as a causal gamer? If so why?

Comments

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    There's 3 different way I think it can be defined, although they have a lot of cross-over: time spent on the game, difficulty of content and 'commitment' required to complete content.

    A casual gamer can be someone who does not devote a lot of time to the game. Exact numbers are hugely variable and IMO depends on the game - for example a hardcore Pokémon Go player will play on their lunch break and for a few hours on weekends, but for an MMO the same amount of time could be considered casual play. (First time I realised I'd be considered a casual gamer was back in Ultima Online when it finally clicked that when people said you could grind a skill in a day they meant 8 or more hours - not the one hour I was allowed on our dial up internet.) But basically if it's determined by time a casual gamer is someone who does not spend a lot of time on the game and is unlikely to prioritise it over other things.

    Difficulty depends on the type of content (so the specifics also vary by game). In GW2 I'd say anything which most people could complete solo or which can be done with (almost) any build/s is casual gameplay - for example the personal story and living story, map completion and of course things where ability doesn't really come into it like crafting. Hardcore content is things where you need practice and experience to get it right, like raids, high level Fractals or completing dungeons solo.

    Commitment is kind of a combination of the two - things which require a lot of time and doing a lot of stuff in game but which may seem easy to people who like the difficult content - making a legendary for example. You have to do at least a bit of everything (except sPvP), it takes a lot of time and at least at first it's extremely daunting, but it's not difficult exactly. Commitment can also means focused gameplay - like farming an area for hours (in one go or a bit at a time over several days) to get gold or collecting all the skins in a set.

    Of course there's a lot of grey areas too since it's rare that a game jumps straight from easy, casual stuff to extremely challenging hardcore stuff, in most games the majority of activities probably fall somewhere in the middle and different people will have different standards. For example I was tempted to include jumping puzzles as casual gameplay until I remembered the hours I spent trying to get through them at first, but then other people always found them easy and were able to do them on the first try. Same with beating the Queens Gauntlet - I watched a friend make it seem effortless but I had to practice against Liadri over and over and over to get the timing right and found it hugely difficult.

    Player-made 'challenges' can add to the confusion. For example at one point I set out to play through every single personal story instance. That's definitely casual content, but it required playing 30 different characters to level 20, 15 to level 30, 9 to level 50 and 6 to level 80 which as you can probably imagine took a lot of time (even with tomes and scrolls).

    Basically I think of it as a spectrum with different games and different content within them falling closer to one end or the other.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation EU. Mini Collector.

    "In this town, we call home, everyone hail to the pumpkin song! In this town, don't we love it now? Everyone's waiting for the next surprise!"

  • Obtena.7952Obtena.7952 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Here are a few things that I would characterize casual players with:

    • Plays for an hour or two at a time
    • Plays according to life schedule, not game schedule
    • Has more money than time
    • Less concerned about achievements, more concerned about experiencing
    • Plays for themselves, not for other players
    • Not concerned about 'the best' way to do something, more concerned about 'style'

    If you think balancing is only driven by performance and justified by comparisons to other classes then prepare to be educated:

    https://www.guildwars2.com/en/news/balance-updates-the-heralds-near-future-and-pvp-league-season-13/

  • Azure The Heartless.3261Azure The Heartless.3261 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 12, 2019

    Casual: anyone who wants fun and easy over challenge and is put off by any content they must do repeatedly in order to succeed at.

    Hardcore: anyone that is willing to practice any given content in order to succeed at said content.

    casuals want instant gratification, hardcore want delayed.

    [Charr Noises]
    [Plays every class]
    [JUST GIT EVEN GUDDER ITS FINE]

  • MrForz.1953MrForz.1953 Member ✭✭✭
    edited March 12, 2019

    The term is broad. But my take is that it's just the definition of someone playing games and doing stuffs when he feels like it.

    Disgruntled Charr Engineer and Pirate - Jade Quarry

  • IndigoSundown.5419IndigoSundown.5419 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    There's 3 different way I think it can be defined, although they have a lot of cross-over: time spent on the game, difficulty of content and 'commitment' required to complete content.

    These are pretty much the three areas that distinguish "casual" gamers from other types. One could even argue that commitment is not in itself a distinguishing factor, as commitment often manifests as playing long hours and/or exhibiting the dedication to pursue more difficult content.

    The thing is, if there are different types of "casual" players, and I think there are, then casual does not always mean "prefers only easy content." It could mean, "tackles harder content on a casual (time) basis. You could also have players who play huge hours, but avoid the hardest content. They'd be casual (challenge level) players.

    I use both, and usually distinguish between the types so people know what I'm talking about.

    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. -- Santayana

  • Mea.5491Mea.5491 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    To me, casual is someone who plays occasionally for a short period of time.
    However, some people call me causal because I play open world PvE 95% of the time. But I do that for 6-8 hours every day so I'm confused! :D

  • MoriMoriMori.5349MoriMoriMori.5349 Member ✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    To me, "casual gaming" is not gaming at all. It's a game-like activity, a surrogate, if you want, a proverbial "press X to win". What other people describe above (go to OpenWorld, do whatever event you want without thinking about meta/efficiency, play whatever build you want, even if it's inefficient as hell) is just a regular gaming. I'm not sure why somebody started to call it "casual", perhaps it's just because a lot of content in OpenWorld can be beaten by rolling your face on your keyboard, at least while playing with some professions / builds.

    Also has little to do with how much time you spend playing. You can play once a week for a few hours, but still play a game, i.e. face some challenges, solve some problems, make decisions (correct and not so), get lucky and unlucky - that what game is. "Casual game" is when you just repeat a specific pattern again and again, and is sure in the outcome of it (you can't lose, or failure is highly unlikely, at least, until you just repeat some pattern). So running in some meta-abusing zerg on Silverwaste, when your only "challenge" is to manage to tag some mob before it's shredded into pieces, is not a game at all, for me, and meets the definition of "casual gaming" quite well :) Still won't be a hardcore gaming if you'll be doing it 24/7 (I bet somebody do)

  • trev.1045trev.1045 Member ✭✭✭

    Casual gaming to me doesnt mean you want it easy, nor does it mean you want instant gratification....

    It doesnt mean that you wont try and play the character to its best ability either

    Generally casual gaming means being able to play in short bursts, without having to worry about sticking to schedules (such as raid nights etc)
    For me it also means if i am wanted in the house--- i log out within a minute or so.

    I think 'hardcore' gaming is probably a much smaller market than 10 years ago, going back further to when i first started gaming (MUDS) you were expected to apply to a guild, pass a bunch of tests (pkilling etc), serve as an apprentice in the guild....and be able to memorise 100 or so directions to spam to get to the site of combat... oh and if you died your gear would get looted :)

    Ive been hardcore (muds), semi serious (early wow) and now i am happily aging and ultra casual....

  • MithranArkanere.8957MithranArkanere.8957 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Not requiring lots of preparation or coordination with other players to engage in a short session of gameplay.

  • Lexi.1398Lexi.1398 Member ✭✭✭

    Casual is a little hard to classify in the context of gw2- it isn't really a hardcore game, there's no real penalty to losing/dying except in pride, whereas other online games have a variety of punishments, and especially more so in single player games, where you have to lose items, money (including via equipment repairs), progress, stats, or even the entire ability to play at all. Someone who likes hardcore probably doesn't play gw2 for that type of game. Then, lots of mmos/games in general nowadays realise it's such a small niche market it's better to appeal to casual gamers- most popular games don't tend to go with huge punishments cus that discourages people from playing.

    And then..... there's the difference between casual, hardcore, and some middle zone- which, in the context of gw2, may even change per game mode for an individual.

    To me, i see casual as someone who plays a game because it looks shiny. Crucially, i think someone who is casual does not feel any prestige from game achievements, so they are not driven to attain them, as such things which require a lot of effort are usually avoided in favour of simple things which will be more fun to them. Mostly they're here for the story and will not do anything that requires a great amount of committment or learning to do.

    On the other end "hardcore" players could be considered the opposite- they derive joy from achieving something in a game, and to do that will go out of their way to have something to show off, no matter how much time and effort it takes. Whether it's maxing out dps with a learnt rotation, trying for ogre wars everyday for treasure hunter, or even something like wanting to get as much of the wardrobe as possible. Challenge is welcomed because it's all the more satisfying to finally achieve something.

    Then there's the gaint middle zone- I like to think i fit somewhere between hardcore and centre if this were to be a scale. Middle zone likes prestige and is satisfied by challenge, but is unlikely to go to great lengths to get it- either through not having enough spare time, not having enough patience, not wanting to specialise in a certain content, doesn't enjoy high levels of challenge. They're still gonna do quite a lot, but maybe not spending every hour agonising over the perfect rotation or mopping up every single AP in game. I'd say anyone who gets at least some of their dailies/weeklies (wvw, raids) done is in this semi casual middle zone at least for example.

    I don't think time is a factor really- you can be a super committed player who does damage calculations in your work breaks but still only play on weekends, even if that time is all spent on confirming build theories.

  • joneirikb.7506joneirikb.7506 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Seen a lot of good points in posts here.

    I'm going to say that I feel that people generally tend to color casual/hardcore way too black and white. The "hardcore" has usually been a reference to the very few that really goes in for something. In the same way the "casual" should mean those that really doesn't commit to things, as an example.

    Basically, people aren't either hardcore OR casual, I'd say 90+% of the players are in-between. But humans likes to simplify things to black/white, yes/no, on/off, and thus makes a larger problem out of things than they really are.

    I would probably touch on peoples definition of hardcore on some points, but probably be so far out on casual on other things, that I'd likely freak a lot of people out. :)

    Elrik Noj (Norn Guardian, Kaineng [SIN][Owls])
    "Understanding is a three edged sword: your side, their side, and the truth." - J. Michael Straczynski
    "GW2 is a MSOFGG: Mass Singleplayer Online Fashion Grinding Game" -me

  • TwiceDead.1963TwiceDead.1963 Member ✭✭✭

    Casual to me...

    Someone who plays at their own pace. They're not bound to anything or anyone and do whatever they feel like.

  • Yamazuki.6073Yamazuki.6073 Member ✭✭✭

    I'm not sure what's wrong with just sticking to what casual actually means, rather than coming up with a million different meanings for a word that already has one:
    Not serious.

    Casual gamers are simply people who play games to relax. They aren't competitive, they don't worry about being the best at anything, they just want to spend their free time doing what they enjoy.

    Limited playtime isn't a casual thing, limited playtime is usually due to life situations (long work hours, being parents, etc). One of the most casual players I met played games for 10+ hours a day. He never cared for min-maxing, never cared for end-game content as much, nor did he ever care to follow the meta on any game; he simply played games in his spare time for enjoyment. This means even someone with limited time could be non-casual if they played competitively. I have friends that are in the military, and one hit Challenger on League, but mostly sat around Master due to not being able to play all day from work/family, he played the game very seriously, as well as other games. If some looked purely at his playtime, they would assume he's just casual, but if they looked purely at his attitude/mindset they would think the complete opposite.

  • Gop.8713Gop.8713 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Cragga the Eighty Third.6015 said:
    Casual gamer--Has fun in the game, doing whatever they want, however they want to do it, without worrying about the details. Thinks serious gamers must be kind of nuts.

    Serious gamer--Spends hours studying online. Fine-tunes their build and knows every detail of how their character works and how every weapon and upgrade changes their performance statistics, and knows every little detail about the very BEST way to succeed at their preferred game mode/meta and thinks casual gamers must be kind of nuts.

    This is the one I'd give 'best answer' of those submitted so far. I consider myself a casual player, which to me means I'd rather play the game than learn the game. It has nothing to do with how much I play, bc I play a lot. It has nothing to do with what content I play, bc I have played all of it and I regularly play a lot of it. It has to do with how I play, bc I would rather start than wait. I won't spend time trying to design my own build, unless what I'm using just won't work for what I'm trying to do. I will read enough about a build to understand it before I rip it off a site, but I won't remember all the nuances once I've spent time learning the basics of how to play it. I will play 'high end' content, but I won't join any group that asks for 'experience' or 'speedrunning' or anything like that, even if it is content I know I can do well . . .

    Basically, I think I'm casual bc I'm here to play . . .

    The only slight change I would make to the quoted definition is that even though I would define myself as casual I don't think there is anything wrong with the ppl who want to take the game more seriously. I know I'm playing with other ppl so I expect them to have different perspectives about what they want from the game . . .

  • Daishi.6027Daishi.6027 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    When you don't play optimally for your chosen part of the game.

    If you take a full zerk build and just havoc in WvW, you are probably playing it casually even if you win all your 1v1s.

    If you raid or fractal with builds that don't intend to clear them as fast as possible; you are probably casual.

    If you sPvP and refuse to learn matchups, or your role and expectations in conquest and never pay attention to chat; you are probably causal.

    If you just log in do daily, and play around in open world stuff without trying to speed clear event maps or lead, and don't kill players ever, or raid, or frac; you are probably casual.

    If you don't spend all day PvPing the trading post to be a billionaire; you are probably casual.

    Also keep in mind that this may not be the end of list, I'm sure there may be a growing scene for mount races and stuff, and whether you PvP to kill players, or snipe the trade post I wont judge your level of play, but if you are not doing your best to do things at the optimal meta level, or at least a reasonable deviation that nets good results; you are probably casual in that area of the game.

    There is nothing wrong with being casual, to each their own. But you have no right to complain about balance, that is on YOU to get better.
    "Dark were the skies and chilled was the wind, but the casuals cried so they nerfed the weather." - Totalbiscuit.

    If you complain that a living story mission is to hard... wat r u? casul?

  • ArchonWing.9480ArchonWing.9480 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    Casual player-- one that plays the game for entertainment value (or sometimes social reasons)
    Hardcore Players-- Players that seek to get better by practicing and learning game mechanics.

    However, there is overlap at times. Just because you don't take a game that seriously doesn't mean you want to improve and just because you do take the game seriously doesn't mean you can't play the game for social interaction. There is a 3rd type though

    Toxic Casual-- Either this is a casual player that's deluded into thinking they're hardcore, or someone that takes the game too seriously and is in denial. The problem is they take the game too seriously and want all the shinies so they can't actually be casual yet lack the drive and skill to be actually competent. In any case, entitlement is generally extreme and if you hear anyone babble on about "being a veteran since X" or even worse, "being a gamer", rest assured, they're most likely terrible. In general, they're also the ones that start this toxicity when it comes to hardcore vs casual to begin with.

  • Casuals are the ones who plays for enjoyment and doesn't have a set time to play. They are okay with people not using meta builds because they just want to have fun.

    Hardcores are the ones who is eager to learn their class and builds. Whether it be in PvE, PvP, or WvW, they want to do their best. They are more serious on game play and try to find ways to improve. They also use meta builds and rely on their teammates to know what their roles are. Not all but most practice their fighting skills to gain muscle memory so whatever they're doing, they'll know what to do without having to think twice about it. Their type of enjoyment is achieving goals, teamwork, and winning.

    There are those inbetweeners who does certian things like raid once or twice a week. They play meta builds and know them but they rarely play the game.

    There's more too it but too much to type after midnight xD

  • derd.6413derd.6413 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    i'd say the difference lies more in how they make decisions about the game.
    a casual does what seem the most fun at the time while a hardcore gamer will choose the most efficient way to do something. i think it mainly comes from a point of dedication to the game tho.
    and it's less a "one or the other" and more of a spectrum

    I Have No friends, so I Must pug

  • @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:
    Casual: anyone who wants fun and easy over challenge and is put off by any content they must do repeatedly in order to succeed at.

    Hardcore: anyone that is willing to practice any given content in order to succeed at said content.

    casuals want instant gratification, hardcore want delayed.

    I'm going to disagree, on principle. While it's certainly a credible, if over simplified view, there's nuances at work here that you're missing.

    I consider myself to be something of a casual player, across the board in all the MMOs I play, despite the fact that I can do hardcore content. My builds, where applicable, gear and understanding to the game's mechanics are on par with most of the upper echelon of players, except for here, where I only have about 5 months experience, and really haven't looked at the hardcore content yet. Even here, though, I strive for the best gear I can get so that I'm not a detriment to the things I do participate in. I will never, however, exclusively run with the elite crowd. Once it starts being about "grinding the dailies" instead of "let's have some fun" it loses it's appeal. This too, is across the board. I grouped with some players for some Epic Elite content, while being 5 levels under what's recommended, and when it was done, they were asking why I didn't do more of it, and I told them that, if my guildmates hadn't been in that group, I wouldn't have hit the LFG post. In that game they call it "flower sniffing", and that's the way I prefer to play.

    In swtor, I'll spacebar the cutscenes, I've seen them, but I won't be pressuring anyone else to. I'll drink some coffee, or whatever, while they get the story behind what we're doing. In that respect, I'm still "casual" because I'm not trying to rush the completion. I group up accordingly. I won't be expecting others to follow my example, and so, those that are in a big hurry will be better off in another group. I'm not in a big hurry.

    As to your last line, I think you have that backwards: Hardcore will put in the time to learn and gear for the content, but once that's done, they're not willing to wait for anyone, whereas a casual wants to watch the cutscenes, if any apply, and experience the whole thing. Casuals aren't really the people that won't learn a boss fight, that's just bad players in general. They believe they know what they're doing, and don't want anyone telling them what they need to do. While bad players can be casual, it's not a direct correlation. You don't have to be bad to be casual. This is why there was a "gear check" thread, because the hardcore want to make sure you're qualified to run with them.

  • Cyninja.2954Cyninja.2954 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    The overarching and applicable definition is, as mentioned earlier:
    Someone who enjoys a game on a simple level without over-engaging or over-involving themselves with the game.

    First off, is this bad? Absolutely not, it is perfectly fine to play games as pure leisure and fun without over-committing.

    Given that definition, we can now sort in some of the factors which often come up with casual gaming:

    • A.) Limited Time.
      Limited time can often lead to people playing games more casually due to both not enough available time to over-indulge or no desire to do so. If you work an 8 hour job and have family, some things simply do not fly any more. The defining word here is can since there is players with limited time who efficiently use their time to improve and maximize their game performance even when limited in hours per day/week.

    • B.) It's a game, I just play it to relax.
      This is probably also a big aspect casual players use as approach. If all you want it to spend some time gaming, why over-analyze or spend time doing chores? Perfectly fine approach.

    • C.) I just don't get it.
      Some players simply lack the understanding or desire to understand game mechanics or proper tools and ability to find help to optimize. As a result they just lack the ability to improve or seek help. Also before anyone gets triggered, this is not unique to casual players, there is a ton of "hardcore"players who also fall in this category, unfortunately often more resilient to advice.

    • D.) Content challenge.
      Lack of challenge can cause people to approach content at a more leisure pace. This is a two-sided coin since, while some causal players might improve their game play or involvement with rising challenge, many might avoid content which is over-demanding. It can both be the cause for casual play as well as a factor for no casual play.

    • E.) Hardcore players demand challenge and recognition, casual players less so.
      If you start spending a lot of time on any activity, it is natural to either master it and crave more challenge or some form of recognition. This can vary in age or type of character of each individual.

    As such, the often cared about time devoted to playing the game as definition is lacking but rather a persons approach to said game is relevant.

  • XenoSpyro.1780XenoSpyro.1780 Member ✭✭✭

    The words 'casual' and 'professional' don't mean anything anymore.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @IndigoSundown.5419 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    There's 3 different way I think it can be defined, although they have a lot of cross-over: time spent on the game, difficulty of content and 'commitment' required to complete content.

    These are pretty much the three areas that distinguish "casual" gamers from other types. One could even argue that commitment is not in itself a distinguishing factor, as commitment often manifests as playing long hours and/or exhibiting the dedication to pursue more difficult content.

    The thing is, if there are different types of "casual" players, and I think there are, then casual does not always mean "prefers only easy content." It could mean,** "tackles harder content on a casual (time) basis.** You could also have players who play huge hours, but avoid the hardest content. They'd be casual (challenge level) players.

    I use both, and usually distinguish between the types so people know what I'm talking about.

    That would be me. I'm happy to attempt anything in this game and often play single-player games on harder difficulty settings, but in relatively short sections. Sometimes it's annoying though - I'd like to raid in GW2 but it's hard to commit to playing for 2-3 hours uninterrupted. Sometimes I have that long, but I rarely know that in advance and when I do it's likely to be at an odd time like 10am on a Monday when no one's raiding.

    @XenoSpyro.1780 said:
    The words 'casual' and 'professional' don't mean anything anymore.

    Well professional does, it means someone who is actually able to make a living playing games in tournaments, on Twitch and however else they make money from doing it. Just like a professional athlete is one whose job is playing their sport.

    The problem is lots of people don't use it that way. People will call themselves professional (or more likely just pro) gamers and what they really mean is "I think I'm pretty good at most the games I play". But unlike casual/hardcore it does have an actual definition, even if it gets misused.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation EU. Mini Collector.

    "In this town, we call home, everyone hail to the pumpkin song! In this town, don't we love it now? Everyone's waiting for the next surprise!"

  • mercury ranique.2170mercury ranique.2170 Member ✭✭✭✭

    The issue is that slang is different then language. It lacks proper discussion and consensus building upon what a term means. The result is that there is no dictionary. Another issue is that the community is split between different games and casual gaming in one game means something different then casual gaming in another game.
    It also means that definitions can change over time. Someone who is very much against elitsm in the game might find it heroic to call themself a casual gamer just to go against this elitism (while still playing content like WvW, sPvP, Raids and fractals in a "casual" context with e.g. guildies). On the other hand, those who thrive for min/max and optimum speedruns and being competitive in all game modes might associate casual gaming with noobs that are not worth much and need to be avoided.

    So it is all in the eye of the beholder.

  • kharmin.7683kharmin.7683 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Obtena.7952 said:
    Here are a few things that I would characterize casual players with:

    • Plays for an hour or two at a time
    • Plays according to life schedule, not game schedule
    • Has more money than time
    • Less concerned about achievements, more concerned about experiencing
    • Plays for themselves, not for other players
    • Not concerned about 'the best' way to do something, more concerned about 'style'

    Yeah, pretty much all of the above. I would also add "playing non-competitive content" for me.

    @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:
    casuals want instant gratification, hardcore want delayed.

    As a very casual gamer, I almost find this opinion to be offensive. Please don't paint us with such a broad brush. ;)

    @Yamazuki.6073 said:
    I'm not sure what's wrong with just sticking to what casual actually means, rather than coming up with a million different meanings for a word that already has one:
    Not serious.

    Casual gamers are simply people who play games to relax. They aren't competitive, they don't worry about being the best at anything, they just want to spend their free time doing what they enjoy.

    For me and my casual "guild", this is pretty spot on. :)

    I am a very casual player.
    Very.
    Casual.

  • Goettel.4389Goettel.4389 Member ✭✭✭✭

    The less time-investment I have to do before getting 'to the good bit' in games, the more casual the game.
    Which is why GW2 offers a great casual experience: the good bit starts at level 1 (so say my 12 toons).

  • Rogue.8235Rogue.8235 Member ✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    Casual Gaming has nothing to do with skill level, length of playtime, competitiveness, or any other thing that I see tossed around here. A casual gamer is someone who plays for the enjoyment of the experience of video games, which is an interactive medium that cannot be replicated by any other form of entertainment. You can be very skillful, play difficult content, play for a lot or a little, do pvp and raids, or open world, none of that matters. You're playing for the enjoyment of the game.

    So where do hardcore gamers fit in? Games are puzzles to them. Solve the logic puzzle that happens to have thematically homogeneous audio and video feedback. Hardcore gamers solve the puzzle of finding the most optimal, efficient way of completing a given task. That is all it is to them. There is no story, just the thrill of mastering the mechanics given by the rules of the game (puzzle to them). The enjoyment for hardcore games comes not from the immersive experience created by the developers, but from solving the puzzle of completing a task with a given set of constraints (profession, traits, skills, weapons, stats).

    Again, the difference between casual and hardcore has NOTHING to do with skill-level, length of playtime, playtime activities, competitiveness, or willingness to learn the mechanics. It has everything to do with the mindset and intent of playing video games.

    "The ancient Oracle said I was the wisest of all the Greeks. It is because I alone, of all the Greeks, know that I know nothing." -Socrates
    "Victorious warriors win first, then go to war. Defeated warriors go to war first, then seek to win."-Sun Tzu

  • TheGrimm.5624TheGrimm.5624 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Have to agree with some of the above, casual gamer, IMO is playing when you want versus feeling the need to play. Have 10K hours in game but would still consider myself a casual gamer. It's a mindset.

    Envy the Madman his musing when Death comes to make fools of us all.
    De Mortuis Nil Nisi Bonum.
    TheGrimm PoTBS/GW1/WAR/Rift/GW2/MWO/ESO/WoT/WoW/D2/HoTS/Civ6/CU/AoC

  • Tsakhi.8124Tsakhi.8124 Member ✭✭✭

    My version of casual: I get to it when I get to it and if someone needs assistance with something, and you're not busy, assist them. Also, I don't know about anyone else, but I like my gaming at a slow burn. :9 No need for gratification, I just wanna enjoy my time in a world not my own.

    There is a reason the old paths are behind us; the only way we can see what's in front of us is to look forward and remember why the old paths were left behind.
    "I always thought that Joko was a THOT."
    Bruh, fix your car.

  • joneirikb.7506joneirikb.7506 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Rogue.8235 said:
    Casual Gaming has nothing to do with skill level, length of playtime, competitiveness, or any other thing that I see tossed around here. A casual gamer is someone who plays for the enjoyment of the experience of video games, which is an interactive medium that cannot be replicated by any other form of entertainment. You can be very skillful, play difficult content, play for a lot or a little, do pvp and raids, or open world, none of that matters. You're playing for the enjoyment of the game.

    So where do hardcore gamers fit in? Games are puzzles to them. Solve the logic puzzle that happens to have thematically homogeneous audio and video feedback. Hardcore gamers solve the puzzle of finding the most optimal, efficient way of completing a given task. That is all it is to them. There is no story, just the thrill of mastering the mechanics given by the rules of the game (puzzle to them). The enjoyment for hardcore games comes not from the immersive experience created by the developers, but from solving the puzzle of completing a task with a given set of constraints (profession, traits, skills, weapons, stats).

    Again, the difference between casual and hardcore has NOTHING to do with skill-level, length of playtime, playtime activities, competitiveness, or willingness to learn the mechanics. It has everything to do with the mindset and intent of playing video games.

    You make it sound like a hardcore can't enjoy the game for the games sake, and that casuals are the only ones that can have fun ?

    I don't think that the definition of "Casual = fun", I believe it is more about how different people approach fun. Nor do I think that casual is everyone that isn't hardcore, as it has often been thrown around.

    Elrik Noj (Norn Guardian, Kaineng [SIN][Owls])
    "Understanding is a three edged sword: your side, their side, and the truth." - J. Michael Straczynski
    "GW2 is a MSOFGG: Mass Singleplayer Online Fashion Grinding Game" -me

  • My version is pretty simple - do I play to the detriment of offline activities? If not, then casual, if so, then.. not so casual. Both real life and apples take priority over gaming. Unless it's like, snowing again.

  • Rauderi.8706Rauderi.8706 Member ✭✭✭✭

    I define it mostly according to play time per week. This is no indication of skill, since that is more a matter of experience with games overall and long-term exposure to the game itself.

    Many alts! Handle it!

    "A condescending answer might as well not be an answer at all."
    -Eloc Freidon.5692

  • Rogue.8235Rogue.8235 Member ✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    @joneirikb.7506 said:

    @Rogue.8235 said:
    Casual Gaming has nothing to do with skill level, length of playtime, competitiveness, or any other thing that I see tossed around here. A casual gamer is someone who plays for the enjoyment of the experience of video games, which is an interactive medium that cannot be replicated by any other form of entertainment. You can be very skillful, play difficult content, play for a lot or a little, do pvp and raids, or open world, none of that matters. You're playing for the enjoyment of the game.

    So where do hardcore gamers fit in? Games are puzzles to them. Solve the logic puzzle that happens to have thematically homogeneous audio and video feedback. Hardcore gamers solve the puzzle of finding the most optimal, efficient way of completing a given task. That is all it is to them. There is no story, just the thrill of mastering the mechanics given by the rules of the game (puzzle to them). The enjoyment for hardcore games comes not from the immersive experience created by the developers, but from solving the puzzle of completing a task with a given set of constraints (profession, traits, skills, weapons, stats).

    Again, the difference between casual and hardcore has NOTHING to do with skill-level, length of playtime, playtime activities, competitiveness, or willingness to learn the mechanics. It has everything to do with the mindset and intent of playing video games.

    You make it sound like a hardcore can't enjoy the game for the games sake, and that casuals are the only ones that can have fun ?

    I don't think that the definition of "Casual = fun", I believe it is more about how different people approach fun. Nor do I think that casual is everyone that isn't hardcore, as it has often been thrown around.

    You misinterpreted my statements. Hardcore gamers have fun solving the puzzle. I'm casual when it comes to MMORPG's but completely hardcore when it comes to fighting games and Civilization. Hardcore gamers find enjoyment in optimizing constraints to complete the game's objectives in the most efficient manner possible In fighting games, I never execute moves just because they look cool or that's how I want to beat the other player. I always execute the optimal move in any given circumstance during a match-up. I'm the same way with chess. I make optimal moves, I don't capture pieces or use certain pieces just for the fun in it. For me, the fun in chess and fighting games is executing perfection, not the experience of the game

    If you don't find enjoyment in optimizing constraints and executing the most efficient ways to solve the logic puzzle of a game's objective, you are not hardcore. I am definitely not hardcore in GW2.

    Thus, hardcore gamers and casual gamers equally have fun with the same video game. How they derive that enjoyment is what separates them.

    Edit: Wanted to reiterate that the casual <-> hardcore spectrum has nothing to do with skill-level, competitiveness, length of play, willingness to learn, or playtime activities. It is solely based on how you view the game and how you derive your enjoyment and fun from that game.

    "The ancient Oracle said I was the wisest of all the Greeks. It is because I alone, of all the Greeks, know that I know nothing." -Socrates
    "Victorious warriors win first, then go to war. Defeated warriors go to war first, then seek to win."-Sun Tzu

  • Ol Nik.2518Ol Nik.2518 Member ✭✭✭

    Cambridge Dictionary defines casual as:

    • casual adjective (INFORMAL)
    • casual adjective (NOT INTERESTED)
      not taking or not seeming to take much interest

    • casual adjective (TEMPORARY)
      C2 [ before noun ] not regular or fixed

    • casual adjective (CHANCE)
      ​B2 [ before noun ] not serious or considered, or done by chance

    American English instead of Informal and chance nuances suggests:

    • casual adjective (NOT SERIOUS)
      not serious or careful in attitude; only partly interested

    • casual adjective (NOT PLANNED)
      not intended or planned

    In general usage casual mostly defines the attitude toward something, i.e. behavioural patterns. I would say that with casual players it is also about the attitude rather than gear, content level, shinies, real-life circumstances, time spent on a game, and so on.

    I know players who spend zero time doing content (they never leave big cities) and log in only once or twice a week or even less than that. They are not really concerned with achievements, meta builds, dodging skills, or the latest raid boss mechanics. However, I would not dare to call them casual. They spend a lot of time analysing markets, using external tools, creating and updating spreadsheets, collecting data, developing their own tools for the game, and so on. These players focus on economy with a great deal of passion. They are very hardcore players.

    I would suggest that a casual player is the one who approaches the game as a leisure activity and do not put a lot of effort or make a significant emotional investment. The game, in this case, is a way to kill some time before returning to more demanding and important parts of one's life. However, since we are very different people there is no universal set of criteria to determine whether someone is a casual or hardcore player without knowing their attitudes.

  • @kharmin.7683 said:

    @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:
    casuals want instant gratification, hardcore want delayed.

    As a very casual gamer, I almost find this opinion to be offensive. Please don't paint us with such a broad brush. ;)

    I don't consider anyone that plays this game to be a casual gamer, as the initial complexity of the game is already heavy. I usually reserve that for people that play angry birds and tetris on the surface level merely to pass some time.

    You and I may be thinking about different things. Imo playing an mmo to some degree of competency automatically removes you from the "casual" label.

    [Charr Noises]
    [Plays every class]
    [JUST GIT EVEN GUDDER ITS FINE]

  • joneirikb.7506joneirikb.7506 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Rogue.8235 said:

    @joneirikb.7506 said:

    @Rogue.8235 said:
    Casual Gaming has nothing to do with skill level, length of playtime, competitiveness, or any other thing that I see tossed around here. A casual gamer is someone who plays for the enjoyment of the experience of video games, which is an interactive medium that cannot be replicated by any other form of entertainment. You can be very skillful, play difficult content, play for a lot or a little, do pvp and raids, or open world, none of that matters. You're playing for the enjoyment of the game.

    So where do hardcore gamers fit in? Games are puzzles to them. Solve the logic puzzle that happens to have thematically homogeneous audio and video feedback. Hardcore gamers solve the puzzle of finding the most optimal, efficient way of completing a given task. That is all it is to them. There is no story, just the thrill of mastering the mechanics given by the rules of the game (puzzle to them). The enjoyment for hardcore games comes not from the immersive experience created by the developers, but from solving the puzzle of completing a task with a given set of constraints (profession, traits, skills, weapons, stats).

    Again, the difference between casual and hardcore has NOTHING to do with skill-level, length of playtime, playtime activities, competitiveness, or willingness to learn the mechanics. It has everything to do with the mindset and intent of playing video games.

    You make it sound like a hardcore can't enjoy the game for the games sake, and that casuals are the only ones that can have fun ?

    I don't think that the definition of "Casual = fun", I believe it is more about how different people approach fun. Nor do I think that casual is everyone that isn't hardcore, as it has often been thrown around.

    You misinterpreted my statements. Hardcore gamers have fun solving the puzzle. I'm casual when it comes to MMORPG's but completely hardcore when it comes to fighting games and Civilization. Hardcore gamers find enjoyment in optimizing constraints to complete the game's objectives in the most efficient manner possible In fighting games, I never execute moves just because they look cool or that's how I want to beat the other player. I always execute the optimal move in any given circumstance during a match-up. I'm the same way with chess. I make optimal moves, I don't capture pieces or use certain pieces just for the fun in it. For me, the fun in chess and fighting games is executing perfection, not the experience of the game

    If you don't find enjoyment in optimizing constraints and executing the most efficient ways to solve the logic puzzle of a game's objective, you are not hardcore. I am definitely not hardcore in GW2.

    Thus, hardcore gamers and casual gamers equally have fun with the same video game. How they derive that enjoyment is what separates them.

    Edit: Wanted to reiterate that the casual <-> hardcore spectrum has nothing to do with skill-level, competitiveness, length of play, willingness to learn, or playtime activities. It is solely based on how you view the game and how you derive your enjoyment and fun from that game.

    Ah, thank you for clarification, then we are in agreement.

    Elrik Noj (Norn Guardian, Kaineng [SIN][Owls])
    "Understanding is a three edged sword: your side, their side, and the truth." - J. Michael Straczynski
    "GW2 is a MSOFGG: Mass Singleplayer Online Fashion Grinding Game" -me

  • @joneirikb.7506 said:

    @Rogue.8235 said:
    Casual Gaming has nothing to do with skill level, length of playtime, competitiveness, or any other thing that I see tossed around here. A casual gamer is someone who plays for the enjoyment of the experience of video games, which is an interactive medium that cannot be replicated by any other form of entertainment. You can be very skillful, play difficult content, play for a lot or a little, do pvp and raids, or open world, none of that matters. You're playing for the enjoyment of the game.

    So where do hardcore gamers fit in? Games are puzzles to them. Solve the logic puzzle that happens to have thematically homogeneous audio and video feedback. Hardcore gamers solve the puzzle of finding the most optimal, efficient way of completing a given task. That is all it is to them. There is no story, just the thrill of mastering the mechanics given by the rules of the game (puzzle to them). The enjoyment for hardcore games comes not from the immersive experience created by the developers, but from solving the puzzle of completing a task with a given set of constraints (profession, traits, skills, weapons, stats).

    Again, the difference between casual and hardcore has NOTHING to do with skill-level, length of playtime, playtime activities, competitiveness, or willingness to learn the mechanics. It has everything to do with the mindset and intent of playing video games.

    You make it sound like a hardcore can't enjoy the game for the games sake, and that casuals are the only ones that can have fun ?

    I don't think that the definition of "Casual = fun", I believe it is more about how different people approach fun. Nor do I think that casual is everyone that isn't hardcore, as it has often been thrown around.

    I didn't interpret it that way. For that definition, it's possible that hardcore actually do find that fun.

  • @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:

    @kharmin.7683 said:

    @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:
    casuals want instant gratification, hardcore want delayed.

    As a very casual gamer, I almost find this opinion to be offensive. Please don't paint us with such a broad brush. ;)

    I don't consider anyone that plays this game to be a casual gamer, as the initial complexity of the game is already heavy. I usually reserve that for people that play angry birds and tetris on the surface level merely to pass some time.

    You and I may be thinking about different things. Imo playing an mmo to some degree of competency automatically removes you from the "casual" label.

    Tetris is serious business mate, there's even a league for it, or there used to be...

  • Azure The Heartless.3261Azure The Heartless.3261 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 13, 2019

    @robertthebard.8150 said:

    @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:

    @kharmin.7683 said:

    @Azure The Heartless.3261 said:
    casuals want instant gratification, hardcore want delayed.

    As a very casual gamer, I almost find this opinion to be offensive. Please don't paint us with such a broad brush. ;)

    I don't consider anyone that plays this game to be a casual gamer, as the initial complexity of the game is already heavy. I usually reserve that for people that play angry birds and tetris on the surface level merely to pass some time.

    You and I may be thinking about different things. Imo playing an mmo to some degree of competency automatically removes you from the "casual" label.

    Tetris is serious business mate, there's even a league for it, or there used to be...

    I know, that's why I specified "on the surface level." I guess you could substitute "Bejeweled" or "Candy Crush" for that.

    [Charr Noises]
    [Plays every class]
    [JUST GIT EVEN GUDDER ITS FINE]

  • mauried.5608mauried.5608 Member ✭✭✭

    Is a MMO even a game ?
    I know its a thorny question but MMOs are a bit unique in the sense that playing the game is undefined.
    ie there is nothing which states what a player is required to do in order to play it .
    Just about all other games have some kind of rules which define what the players have to do in order to win the game .
    MMOs cant be won , there are no rules , and players are free to do just about anything they like .
    Simply logging , wandereing around a bit and then logging out is still playing the game.

©2010–2018 ArenaNet, LLC. All rights reserved. Guild Wars, Guild Wars 2, Heart of Thorns, Guild Wars 2: Path of Fire, ArenaNet, NCSOFT, the Interlocking NC Logo, and all associated logos and designs are trademarks or registered trademarks of NCSOFT Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.