What are the pros and cons of using Reshade? — Guild Wars 2 Forums
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What are the pros and cons of using Reshade?

I see Reshade mentioned quite a bit here, normally in conjunction with another topic such as infusions etc being too glowy and the dx12 modification.

I tried the dx12 modification and saw no improvement. But I am running ReActif and Arcdps.

Is Reshade play nice with those two? Should I bother given that I had no noticeable impact from the dx12 interpreter? I have post-processing permanently turned off just to try and save my eyesight.

Comments

  • Astyrah.4015Astyrah.4015 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Hesione.9412 said:
    I see Reshade mentioned quite a bit here, normally in conjunction with another topic such as infusions etc being too glowy and the dx12 modification.

    I tried the dx12 modification and saw no improvement. But I am running ReActif and Arcdps.

    Is Reshade play nice with those two? Should I bother given that I had no noticeable impact from the dx12 interpreter? I have post-processing permanently turned off just to try and save my eyesight.

    ReShade is a post-processing layer that runs on top of the render that you can tweak. an analogy i can think of yet not a perfect one is when you put filters on your camera app on your phone to make stuff look nicer or crazier.

    pros? stuff will look prettier if you configure it properly and use the right combination of shaders

    cons? it's mostly GPU reliant so if you put something really beautiful but likewise very heavy on resources, your fps will tank if your GPU can't keep up with it. CPU-wise it's mostly just to load the shaders and the configs for them. oh and depending on what you run alongside it, it can cause crashes since like ArcDPS, it's also a .dll hook

  • Veprovina.4876Veprovina.4876 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Just a suggestion - try putting post processing to low, then "subduing it" with reshade. Since reshade is a "filter" of a kind on top of what's being shown - if it isn't shown then it can't do anything about it. So ironically, to tame the postprocessing and the effects, first have them on and then use reshade to bring them to how you like it. It can look the way you want to, but of course, you'll have to play with all the settings a lot til you get it to how you like it.

    Hope you have a good GFX card and a processor though, some of the effects are very power hungry. Also, expect whatever you do with reshade to have an effect on the arcdps and any other plugin on screen. So you'll kinda have to do "all of it" at once, i don't think there's an option to exclude some render elements.

    And of course with any 3rd party plugins, if it crashes, there's no support.

    But other than that, if you have the raw horsepower for it, reshade is a great tool to make the game look like you want it to!

  • Hesione.9412Hesione.9412 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you both for your helpful comments. With all the glitzy particle effects on wings, influsions, etc, can reshade tone that down, or does it make those effects even glitzier?

  • Astyrah.4015Astyrah.4015 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 23, 2021

    @Hesione.9412 said:
    Thank you both for your helpful comments. With all the glitzy particle effects on wings, influsions, etc, can reshade tone that down, or does it make those effects even glitzier?

    yw, as for your follow up question: some of the shaders/effects allow for negative values in their settings haven't tried but that in theory wont tone it down but help make certain colours or effects more... bland? but yeah you really have to play around with the configuration and read the relevant documentation for each shader effect when doing your own preset. generally reshade is used to make things look prettier (it's subjective: some want sharper details, vibrant colours, more shiny, etc. etc. when they do their own post processing) so having it do the opposite is i guess possible to a certain but limited extent but you wont be able to turn off gw2's shiny shiny that way

  • huluobo.7036huluobo.7036 Member ✭✭✭

    The disadvantage of reshade is that it will increase the electricity bill, and some blooms will increase the graphics card by a few watts.

  • Veprovina.4876Veprovina.4876 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 23, 2021

    @Hesione.9412 said:
    Thank you both for your helpful comments. With all the glitzy particle effects on wings, influsions, etc, can reshade tone that down, or does it make those effects even glitzier?

    It can tone it down, but you'll have to kinda get creative. There's i think no such thing as "anti bloom", but you can tone that down by say, adjusting the curves and levels plugin. Other plugins will of course have an effect on that too, and like @Astyrah.4015 said, some of them have negative values, you can try that depending on what you want.
    I mean, it lets you directly control each color channel, i'm sure you can find a combination of values that will be satisfying. :wink:

    Of course, try it with and without game post processing, see what looks better. You can either tone down the ingame effects, or lose the post processing in game and "simulate" the effects with Reshade. Both options are valid, each will have a different result, depends on what you like.

    When you install it for the first time, it'll ask you which "plugin effects" to install. You can check up on some of them online what they do, but the documentation on them is not always the best. So if you don't know what they do, just install all of them. It will only ever load the ones you enable on game start so it won't make game loading that much longer if you have all of them. And that way you have options to mess with. :smile:

  • One thing that I like about reshade is using gaussian blur in combination with Luma sharpen to make the textures less blech.
    Tons of shaders to play with and I don't think I could play the game without it now.

  • Veprovina.4876Veprovina.4876 Member ✭✭✭✭

    For taming bloom and glare you can try using shadows/highlits filter to tone down the "aura" around objects, make them appear less eye-stabby.
    But there's also other ways of getting a simmilar result.