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Language pack / Tradition Chinese

Please add a traditional Chinese language pack . We are not asking for a China server!! If we are willing to play with those chinese, we are not asking to add a language pack here.

Hong Kong is not China. Taiwan is not China. We are different. even if the passport, the currency, and written word we are using, are not the same.

Comments

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation EU. Mini Collector.

    "If someone really cared, well they'd take the time to spare, a moment to try and understand another one's despair"

  • Linken.6345Linken.6345 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    If they are allowed to do it since the property of said translation is their chinese partner aint it?

  • Aaralyna.3104Aaralyna.3104 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 30, 2019

    I think this has the same issue as the Russian request. In this case there is a chinese server that has devs in China... (over here they probably don't allow any writing in Latin alphabet). I don't think there are devs in the US that handle chinese at support. Something with not able to read possible insults, players unable to read LFG and such and basically creating exclusivm to play together regardless of background. So you would either have to play at the chinese server or stick to latin alphabet.

  • Ol Nik.2518Ol Nik.2518 Member ✭✭✭
    edited September 30, 2019

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    The OP is talking about the traditional Chinese used in Hong Kong and Taiwan vs simplified Chinese used in mainland China. While they may look the same to people unfamiliar with the writing system they differ, sometimes significantly. I am not quite sure that they are completely interchangeable in terms of Chinese being able to read both. I got the impression that people who learn traditional hanzi (Chinese characters) are better at understanding simplified than vice versa, but my experience is very limited in this regard.

    I suppose that this can be solved by additional fonts that contain traditional hanzi. However, if China is in charge of localisation this might be problematic, because... politics.

  • why need chinese pack, gw2 had been how many yrs now. if anet willing add Chinese pack they done it already.
    also dont bring your political opinions into GW2. in my mind HongKong and Taiwan always belong to China.

  • @Tommo Chocolate.5870 said:

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    The OP is talking about the traditional Chinese used in Hong Kong and Taiwan vs simplified Chinese used in mainland China. While they may look the same to people unfamiliar with the writing system are they differ, sometimes significantly. I am not quite sure that they are completely interchangeable in terms of Chinese being able to read both. I got the impression that people who learn traditional hanzi (Chinese characters) are better at understanding simplified than vice versa, but my experience is very limited in this regard.

    I suppose that this can be solved by additional fonts that contain traditional hanzi. However, if China is in charge of localisation this might be problematic, because... politics.

    Presumably there's also an issue of Mandarin versus Cantonese here as well? At least if the OP intends for language support to include audio since I assume the mainland Chinese version of the game is in Mandarin.

    @JUN YANG.4328 said:
    also dont bring your political opinions into GW2. in my mind HongKong and Taiwan always belong to China.

    Don't you think it's hypocritical to tell people not to bring their political opinions into this and then immediately state yours?

    if you dont know the story dont speak up. people in Taiwan speak Mandarin. Cantonese is not official language.
    Gw2 is not the place to talk about political. if he given his political opinions why cant i?

  • Dawdler.8521Dawdler.8521 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 30, 2019

    @JUN YANG.4328 said:
    Gw2 is not the place to talk about political. if he given his political opinions why cant i?

    Well you either roll around in the dirt or you take the moral high ground. If you have to ask that question, you've already made the choice.

    Either way, I'm not sure Anet would do this on the NA/EU region client. Its going to be a very, very tiny segment of players and they can already use third party apps such as Discord for coms outside the game. GW2 defaults to NA region for alot of countries outside the "standard" ones... and few of them have their specific languages supported.

    Dont look a gift Asura in the mouth.
    No seriously, dont. Shark teeth.

  • Danikat.8537Danikat.8537 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Linken.6345 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    If they are allowed to do it since the property of said translation is their chinese partner aint it?

    Probably. But I would have thought they could work something out, since they are already business partners.

    @Aaralyna.3104 said:
    I think this has the same issue as the Russian request. In this case there is a chinese server that has devs in China... (over here they probably don't allow any writing in Latin alphabet). I don't think there are devs in the US that handle chinese at support. Something with not able to read possible insults, players unable to read LFG and such and basically creating exclusivm to play together regardless of background. So you would either have to play at the chinese server or stick to latin alphabet.

    The problem of players being unable to read LFG already exists, at least on EU servers. We have 4 officially supported languages: English, French, German and Spanish and I've also seen players writing in Italian, Russian, Polish and Dutch fairly often. It's highly unlikely anyone speaks all those languages well enough to be comfortable playing in a group speaking that language.

    Support being unable to read complaints in or about Chinese would be an issue though, unless Anet has staff who speak Chinese.

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    The OP is talking about the traditional Chinese used in Hong Kong and Taiwan vs simplified Chinese used in mainland China. While they may look the same to people unfamiliar with the writing system are they differ, sometimes significantly. I am not quite sure that they are completely interchangeable in terms of Chinese being able to read both. I got the impression that people who learn traditional hanzi (Chinese characters) are better at understanding simplified than vice versa, but my experience is very limited in this regard.

    I suppose that this can be solved by additional fonts that contain traditional hanzi. However, if China is in charge of localisation this might be problematic, because... politics.

    Honestly I just assumed the Chinese version of the game offered both. I don't tend to look for it specifically since I can't read or write either, but as far as I remember most games either have neither or both. GW1 actually just has traditional Chinese. (I remember it having both originally, but I could be wrong about that.)

    Danielle Aurorel - Desolation EU. Mini Collector.

    "If someone really cared, well they'd take the time to spare, a moment to try and understand another one's despair"

  • Ol Nik.2518Ol Nik.2518 Member ✭✭✭
    edited September 30, 2019

    @Tommo Chocolate.5870 said:

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    The OP is talking about the traditional Chinese used in Hong Kong and Taiwan vs simplified Chinese used in mainland China. While they may look the same to people unfamiliar with the writing system are they differ, sometimes significantly. I am not quite sure that they are completely interchangeable in terms of Chinese being able to read both. I got the impression that people who learn traditional hanzi (Chinese characters) are better at understanding simplified than vice versa, but my experience is very limited in this regard.

    I suppose that this can be solved by additional fonts that contain traditional hanzi. However, if China is in charge of localisation this might be problematic, because... politics.

    Presumably there's also an issue of Mandarin versus Cantonese here as well? At least if the OP intends for language support to include audio since I assume the mainland Chinese version of the game is in Mandarin.

    There is indeed a big difference between spoken Mandarin and Cantonese, however, it is not reflected much in writing. Hanzi represent 'words' and 'concepts' rather than phonetics (with the exception of borrowed words). Since the majority of Chinese dialects share similar grammar, differences in pronunciation do not affect the understanding of written words. There are some minor differences that can be reconciled through context. I think for a native English speaker it might be similar to an Australian person reading US texts.

    Fun fact: Chinese people proficient in traditional Chinese can understand enough written Japanese to derive the main idea behind the text (Japanese kanji comes from China) despite not being able to read/speak Japanese or not knowing even basic grammar (I went to a Japanese language school and Chinese students had a huge advantage in this).

  • ugrakarma.9416ugrakarma.9416 Member ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 30, 2019
    1. I doubt Anet will want meddle with chineses political mess.
    2. Consider luckly enough that sanctions didnt affected gaming area yet. Some years ago the crimea political mess affected ucraine players and they get blocked.
    3. More noise on that area, more chances that U.S./Chinese officials will come to mess up things, i recomend dont create much noise and dont bring much attenttion to that still a grey area. your post is like painting a big red target.

    main pvp: Khel the Undead(power reaper).

  • kharmin.7683kharmin.7683 Member ✭✭✭✭

    Wouldn't they need to have someone on staff who is fluent for moderation reasons?

    I am a very casual player.
    Very.
    Casual.

  • huluobo.7036huluobo.7036 Member ✭✭✭

    Do you know that traditional Chinese was invented by the Chinese?

  • @JUN YANG.4328 said:

    @Tommo Chocolate.5870 said:

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    The OP is talking about the traditional Chinese used in Hong Kong and Taiwan vs simplified Chinese used in mainland China. While they may look the same to people unfamiliar with the writing system are they differ, sometimes significantly. I am not quite sure that they are completely interchangeable in terms of Chinese being able to read both. I got the impression that people who learn traditional hanzi (Chinese characters) are better at understanding simplified than vice versa, but my experience is very limited in this regard.

    I suppose that this can be solved by additional fonts that contain traditional hanzi. However, if China is in charge of localisation this might be problematic, because... politics.

    Presumably there's also an issue of Mandarin versus Cantonese here as well? At least if the OP intends for language support to include audio since I assume the mainland Chinese version of the game is in Mandarin.

    @JUN YANG.4328 said:
    also dont bring your political opinions into GW2. in my mind HongKong and Taiwan always belong to China.

    Don't you think it's hypocritical to tell people not to bring their political opinions into this and then immediately state yours?

    if you dont know the story dont speak up. people in Taiwan speak Mandarin. Cantonese is not official language.

    I don't know which "story" you're talking about, but the OP mentioned Hong Kong as well as Taiwan, and Cantonese is the main language spoken in Hong Kong.

    Gw2 is not the place to talk about political. if he given his political opinions why cant i?

    You were the one who said you can't, when you said "dont bring your political opinions into GW2".

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Tommo Chocolate.5870 said:

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Danikat.8537 said:
    Considering there is already a Chinese server which displays Chinese text and I assume has Chinese voice acting this does seem like something Anet could reasonably add.

    The OP is talking about the traditional Chinese used in Hong Kong and Taiwan vs simplified Chinese used in mainland China. While they may look the same to people unfamiliar with the writing system are they differ, sometimes significantly. I am not quite sure that they are completely interchangeable in terms of Chinese being able to read both. I got the impression that people who learn traditional hanzi (Chinese characters) are better at understanding simplified than vice versa, but my experience is very limited in this regard.

    I suppose that this can be solved by additional fonts that contain traditional hanzi. However, if China is in charge of localisation this might be problematic, because... politics.

    Presumably there's also an issue of Mandarin versus Cantonese here as well? At least if the OP intends for language support to include audio since I assume the mainland Chinese version of the game is in Mandarin.

    There is indeed a big difference between spoken Mandarin and Cantonese, however, it is not reflected much in writing. Hanzi represent 'words' and 'concepts' rather than phonetics (with the exception of borrowed words). Since the majority of Chinese dialects share similar grammar, differences in pronunciation do not affect the understanding of written words. There are some minor differences that can be reconciled through context. I think for a native English speaker it might be similar to an Australian person reading US texts.

    Fun fact: Chinese people proficient in traditional Chinese can understand enough written Japanese to derive the main idea behind the text (Japanese kanji comes from China) despite not being able to read/speak Japanese or not knowing even basic grammar (I went to a Japanese language school and Chinese students had a huge advantage in this).

    Thanks for the explanation - that's roughly what I thought, but I didn't know any details. I'm British and I only get confused by US English very occasionally, but I distinctly remember one instance where I misunderstood what a "bag of chips" was...

  • Ol Nik.2518Ol Nik.2518 Member ✭✭✭

    @Tommo Chocolate.5870 said:
    Thanks for the explanation - that's roughly what I thought, but I didn't know any details. I'm British and I only get confused by US English very occasionally, but I distinctly remember one instance where I misunderstood what a "bag of chips" was...

    Every British person gets confused with the US 'chips' at least once :)
    But Americans are equally confused with 'crisps', and even more so with 'torch' or 'anticlockwise'.

  • Ben K.6238Ben K.6238 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @kharmin.7683 said:
    Wouldn't they need to have someone on staff who is fluent for moderation reasons?

    This was mentioned in the other thread as well - in short, no.

    There's nothing preventing the use of Hanyu Pinyin etc. for written communication in Roman characters, and that's still illegible for someone who doesn't know Chinese. It could be easier to translate Chinese characters actually, because they don't have homophones or differences of dialect to confuse their meaning.

  • Aaralyna.3104Aaralyna.3104 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Danikat.8537 said:

    The problem of players being unable to read LFG already exists, at least on EU servers. We have 4 officially supported languages: English, French, German and Spanish and I've also seen players writing in Italian, Russian, Polish and Dutch fairly often. It's highly unlikely anyone speaks all those languages well enough to be comfortable playing in a group speaking that language.

    But I can type a latin alphabet in google translate. I cannot type symbols however (and copy paste of text from game I can't). Chinese can already write in LFG in form of Pinyin (thats what I learnt in my classes Mandarin Chinese at least, next to some of them symbols). As for playing in groups with other languages. I am Dutch and I usually play in English (my personal preference) but I have also played in groups of Germans, Dutch, Portugese, Spanish, and a few French/Canadians as well... It has more to do with how willing the group is to take "outsiders" along. With basic words and descriptions (or showing it) you can get pretty far. So we cannot place players in a box when it comes to that.

  • Ol Nik.2518Ol Nik.2518 Member ✭✭✭

    @Ben K.6238 said:

    @kharmin.7683 said:
    Wouldn't they need to have someone on staff who is fluent for moderation reasons?

    This was mentioned in the other thread as well - in short, no.

    There's nothing preventing the use of Hanyu Pinyin etc. for written communication in Roman characters, and that's still illegible for someone who doesn't know Chinese. It could be easier to translate Chinese characters actually, because they don't have homophones or differences of dialect to confuse their meaning.

    Same goes for @Aaralyna.3104

    There is one small problem... There is no one Chinese language and one pronunciation for hanzi. The OP is specifically talking about Hong Kong and Taiwan and asks about support for traditional Chinese which leads me to believe that they are a speaker of Cantonese rather than Mandarin. Cantonese and Mandarin are not mutually intelligent and phonetically different. Hanyu Pinyin is a romanisation system developed for Mandarin. It is widely used to teach foreigners Standard Chinese, which is based on the Beijing dialect of Mandarin. But it would be wrong to assume that speakers of Cantonese, especially outside of mainland China are familiar with Hanyu Pinyin or Mandarin. Cantonese varieties of Chinese use different romanisation systems and many native speakers are not familiar with them.

  • Ben K.6238Ben K.6238 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Ben K.6238 said:
    This was mentioned in the other thread as well - in short, no.

    There's nothing preventing the use of Hanyu Pinyin etc. for written communication in Roman characters, and that's still illegible for someone who doesn't know Chinese. It could be easier to translate Chinese characters actually, because they don't have homophones or differences of dialect to confuse their meaning.

    Same goes for @Aaralyna.3104

    There is one small problem... There is no one Chinese language and one pronunciation for hanzi. The OP is specifically talking about Hong Kong and Taiwan and asks about support for traditional Chinese which leads me to believe that they are a speaker of Cantonese rather than Mandarin. Cantonese and Mandarin are not mutually intelligent and phonetically different. Hanyu Pinyin is a romanisation system developed for Mandarin. It is widely used to teach foreigners Standard Chinese, which is based on the Beijing dialect of Mandarin. But it would be wrong to assume that speakers of Cantonese, especially outside of mainland China are familiar with Hanyu Pinyin or Mandarin. Cantonese varieties of Chinese use different romanisation systems and many native speakers are not familiar with them.

    I think you might have misinterpreted my point, which is that it's already possible to communicate in the languages that share the 漢字 written system by using romanized phonetic systems, but because of the problems you stated, it raises language barriers between users of Cantonese/Mandarin/other dialects, and it makes it harder for moderators to translate as well. Access to the traditional Chinese character set could potentially benefit both.

  • Ol Nik.2518Ol Nik.2518 Member ✭✭✭

    @Ben K.6238 said:

    @Ol Nik.2518 said:

    @Ben K.6238 said:
    This was mentioned in the other thread as well - in short, no.

    There's nothing preventing the use of Hanyu Pinyin etc. for written communication in Roman characters, and that's still illegible for someone who doesn't know Chinese. It could be easier to translate Chinese characters actually, because they don't have homophones or differences of dialect to confuse their meaning.

    Same goes for @Aaralyna.3104

    There is one small problem... There is no one Chinese language and one pronunciation for hanzi. The OP is specifically talking about Hong Kong and Taiwan and asks about support for traditional Chinese which leads me to believe that they are a speaker of Cantonese rather than Mandarin. Cantonese and Mandarin are not mutually intelligent and phonetically different. Hanyu Pinyin is a romanisation system developed for Mandarin. It is widely used to teach foreigners Standard Chinese, which is based on the Beijing dialect of Mandarin. But it would be wrong to assume that speakers of Cantonese, especially outside of mainland China are familiar with Hanyu Pinyin or Mandarin. Cantonese varieties of Chinese use different romanisation systems and many native speakers are not familiar with them.

    I think you might have misinterpreted my point, which is that it's already possible to communicate in the languages that share the 漢字 written system by using romanized phonetic systems, but because of the problems you stated, it raises language barriers between users of Cantonese/Mandarin/other dialects, and it makes it harder for moderators to translate as well. Access to the traditional Chinese character set could potentially benefit both.

    My bad. It seems that we support the same view. Thank you very much for clarifying.

  • Altough I had enough with these political zealots, but indeed gw1 support T-Chinese, so why not GW2?
    There are still a lot of oversea Chinese around the world.

  • kharmin.7683kharmin.7683 Member ✭✭✭✭

    @Ben K.6238 said:
    it raises language barriers between users of Cantonese/Mandarin/other dialects, and it makes it harder for moderators to translate as well.

    Probably the biggest reason for liability where/when Anet cannot properly moderate things.

    @BAZARK.1235 said:
    Altough I had enough with these political zealots, but indeed gw1 support T-Chinese, so why not GW2?
    There are still a lot of oversea Chinese around the world.

    GW1 is in maintenance mode, so I doubt that the need for moderation is a consideration by Anet.

    I am a very casual player.
    Very.
    Casual.